Lindsay VanHulle

Lindsay VanHulle is a Lansing-based Capitol correspondent covering the intersection of business and public policy in a joint venture that launched in 2015 between Bridge and Crain’s Detroit Business. Prior to joining Bridge, she was a reporter at the Lansing State Journal and Traverse City Record-Eagle. Her work also has appeared in the Detroit Free Press and USA Today. As a business reporter in Lansing, VanHulle covered plans for a $245 million off-reservation tribal casino in Lansing and subsequent court challenges, right-to-work legislation that drew thousands of protesters to the Capitol during lame-duck session in 2012 and dozens of same-sex marriages performed in Ingham County the day after a federal judge overturned Michigan’s ban. She holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Michigan State University and is president of the Mid-Michigan Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. You can reach Lindsay via email at lvanhulle@bridgemi.com, or call her at 517-657-2204.

Articles

Five questions about Foxconn: If Wisconsin balks, what’s it mean for Michigan?

August 14, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Prepare for a fight as Wisconsin lawmakers debate $3 billion in incentives to lure a Taiwanese manufacturer to invest $10 billion and create at least 3,000 jobs. The Wolverine State has a big stake in the outcome.

Programs help Michigan food, agriculture companies expand

August 7, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

The Michigan Department of Agriculture, is piloting a business development incentives program this year to help food-related companies that might be too small to be eligible for MEDC grants.

How to keep a millennial at your company? It ain’t with a ping-pong table

August 7, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

For all their bad press, millennials — the 20- to 30-somethings born roughly between 1980 and 2000 — are the future of work. And Michigan companies have a retention problem.

‘Good Jobs’ law may depend on the definition of good

July 31, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

A tax incentive that rewards companies for creating hundreds or thousands of new jobs will require them to also pay “good” wages. What that means for workers remains is not yet clearly defined.

Q-and-A: New MEDC chief offers blueprint for Michigan’s economy

July 31, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Jeff Mason tells Bridge/Crain’s where he sees opportunities for the state to raise its economic game.

Can a Chilean forestry company revive Grayling?

July 10, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Arauco North America says its new factory will bring 200 jobs to a region desperate for a rebound. How Grayling lured the global forestry giant to northern Michigan may carry lessons for other struggling towns.

Grayling dusts off downtown with brewpubs, galleries

July 10, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Developers want more nightlife and condos, while some voice concern about whether Grayling can maintain its small-town flavor.

Forestry company says it won’t do harm to trout fishing paradise

July 10, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Arauco North America is courting environmental groups looking to preserve northern Michigan streams.

Snyder asks business world for a $6 billion favor

June 12, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

With the governor leaving office next year, business executives are being asked to carry the flag in Lansing for billions of dollars in new investment in education, infrastructure and jobs.

Is business losing clout in Lansing?

June 1, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

For generations, Republican lawmakers worked in lockstep with Michigan’s business establishment. But Lansing’s new GOP leadership is ignoring the priorities of business to pursue its own, anti-tax agenda.

Business leaders on Michigan

June 1, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

What the state’s top executives have to say about the most critical issues facing Michigan (Spoiler alert: It’s not tax cuts)

‘Michigan First’ in state contracts: A good deal for Michigan?

May 30, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Legislation pending in Lansing could well save jobs for a salt mining company operating in Michigan. But it could also increase costs for state taxpayers.

AK Steel tax credits are $60M question for state, drawing backlash

April 16, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

A favorable outcome for AK Steel could set a tax precedent for other companies that wind up in a similar scenario through a merger or acquisition.

Bills would legalize Internet gambling in Michigan, but only through casinos

April 10, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Backers of the legislation point to estimates showing the state could earn up to $60 million in revenue from the law. Fiscal analysts are less bullish.

After three years, Michigan’s working poor are still stuck

April 4, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Despite rising wages and declining jobless rates, four in 10 Michigan households remain unable to afford basic living necessities.

Year-round Daylight Saving Time? Michigan beware

March 27, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Michigan is among more than a dozen states considering bills to halt the biannual time switch. Business leaders in Indiana say it was a disaster for that state.

Do business lures really work?

March 19, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

As the Legislature again takes up incentives to bring businesses to Michigan, there is precious little data publicly available on how Michigan’s performance stacks up

Business chief: Five ways to boost Michigan’s economic growth

February 27, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

To get Michigan counted among the nation’s 10 healthiest state economies, Doug Rothwell said, Lansing must focus on long-term growth, including infrastructure and economic development.

Strapped cities taking aim at Proposal A

February 27, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

Some state leaders are floating a revision to the 1994 Michigan constitutional amendment capping property taxes. The outcome could impact Michigan’s national competitiveness, and the long-term health of its struggling cities.

Snyder budget aims to put more tools in skilled-trades classrooms

February 13, 2017 | Lindsay VanHulle

The $20 million competition Gov. Rick Snyder proposed in his 2018 budget recommendation is modeled after a similar program in 2015 for community colleges that his administration said led to 91 new or expanded career-tech programs at 18 schools.

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