Segregation then and now: Metro Detroit

Following the fire and violence of 1967, Detroit established itself as the most segregated metro area in the country, with African Americans confined to narrow sections of the city and much of the suburbs a no-go zone. (See a Bridge report on the changes.)

Today, hundreds of thousands of African Americans live in communities across the metro region, from the Grosse Pointes to Novi and Warren. But many still live in majority-black communities like Southfield, Pontiac, Inkster and River Rougeor in in majority-black neighborhoods within other cities.

The maps below show regional housing segregation patterns in 1970 and again in 2010. To see demographic changes from 1970 through 2014 by community, check out the database below the maps.

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