Jim Malewitz

Jim Malewitz reports on the environment for Bridge. Based in Lansing, but with plans to scour both peninsulas, he is looking for stories about how public policy, climate change and other phenomena affect the state’s trove of natural resources – all while leaders tout the “Pure Michigan” brand. Jim joined Bridge in November 2017, returning to his home state after a lengthy absence. He spent four years at the Texas Tribune, where he was an investigative reporter and extensively covered energy and environmental issues. He reported on an oil boom and bust, deadly oil refineries, cross-state border squabbles, invasive zebra mussels and gaping sinkholes. His work there also appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, POLITICO Magazine and news outlets across the country. Before moving to Texas, Jim covered energy and the environment for Stateline, a nonprofit news service in Washington, D.C. He majored in political science at Grinnell College in Iowa and holds a master’s degree in journalism from the University of Iowa. There, he helped launch the nonprofit Iowa Center for Public Affairs Journalism, where he currently serves on the board of directors. You can reach Jim at jmalewitz@bridgemi.com or call him at 517-657-3577.

Articles

Did a Michigan campus narrowly avert a massacre like the Florida shooting?

February 15, 2018 | Ron French, Jim Malewitz

We’ve all seen the horrible scenes from a Florida high school. But similar carnage may have visited Lansing Community College in November. But then a worried friend called police.

Coal is dead. A Michigan town is at center of battle over what’s next.

February 14, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Once a dominant fuel in Michigan, coal-fired power is fading fast, with major implications for air quality and the communities that rely on them for jobs. A squabble over a proposed $1 billion natural gas plant in St. Clair County illustrates a broader debate about what comes next.

Here’s where Michigan governor candidates stand on funding toxic cleanups

February 14, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Bridge Magazine asked eight candidates — four Republicans and four Democrats — about how to pay to clean 7,300 toxic sites across Michigan

Michigan Environmental Roundup: Toxic vapors, Great Lakes sanctuary, Legionnaires’ outbreak.

February 14, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

This week’s can’t-miss journalism about Michigan’s natural resources.

Senator wants to defang the ‘radical’ Michigan DEQ. He just may do so.

February 2, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Powerful Sen. Tom Casperson wants to give industry the power to override decisions from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, which he says pushes a “radical left-wing agenda.”

Michigan Environmental Roundup: Ice jams, Lake Michigan and shipwrecks

February 2, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

This week’s can’t-miss journalism about Michigan’s natural resources.

Gov. Rick Snyder wants $5 fee on drinking water for pipe fixes

February 1, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Michigan has hundreds of thousands of lead water lines. The term-limited governor is proposing new fees to fix them.

Even after Flint, lead-free water lines may be a pipe dream in Michigan

January 31, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Gov. Rick Snyder is pushing for the nation’s strictest rules for limiting lead in water supplies. But doing so is expensive, and fellow Republicans are skeptical.

Reforms going nowhere to require Michigan schools to test water for lead

January 31, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

After Flint, lawmakers set aside millions to test water used by children. But the money is unspent, and bills to require testing have gone nowhere.

Read Gov. Rick Snyder’s proposal to remove lead water pipes in Michigan

January 31, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Flint awakened residents to the danger of lead mains. Explore the term-limited governor’s proposal to fix the problem.

Here’s where Michigan 2018 governor candidates stand on lead pipes

January 31, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Bridge Magazine asked eight candidates — four Republicans and four Democrats — about what their visions for clean drinking water following the Flint crisis.

Gov. Rick Snyder pitches plan to clean up Michigan’s polluted sites

January 30, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Michigan has thousands of polluted sites, and funding to clean them up is nearly gone. Its outgoing governor wants to raise the money by boosting trash disposal fees.

Michigan's Great Lakes are good, but water concerns include lead and Line 5

January 23, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Michigan’s lakes and rivers face a wave of challenges. At the same time, the state continues to grapple with new threats to drinking water in communities besides Flint.

Michigan battling 22 invasive forest species, high electric bills

January 23, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Debates about Michigan land resources — and how best to use them — are as old as Michigan itself.  

Michigan has 7,300 toxic sites. Money for cleanups is almost gone.

January 17, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

Funding shortage threatens to halt toxic cleanups in Michigan, including a 6-mile long plume of pollution that’s tainted 13 trillions of groundwater beneath Antrim County. (with map)

Map: Find PFAS chemical threats to Michigan drinking water near your town

January 17, 2018 | Jim Malewitz, Mike Wilkinson

A group of industrial chemicals increasingly is found in Michigan’s environment. See where regulators have flagged them so far.

Cost to Michigan of trusting Enbridge on Line 5: $255 per hour

January 17, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

After Enbridge admitted breaching public trust, Michigan is paying a pair of experts big money to monitor the company’s studies of its controversial pipeline across the Straits of Mackinac.

Michigan environment roundup: toxic blood, salt bombs and solar power

January 17, 2018 | Jim Malewitz

This week’s can’t-miss journalism about Michigan’s natural resources.

Flint lead pipe replacement could be jeopardized by CHIP stalemate

December 5, 2017 | Jim Malewitz

Michigan is spending $119 million in children's health funds to remove lead hazards from home.

What now after Michigan, Enbridge agree to deal on Line 5?

November 27, 2017 | Jim Malewitz

Environmentalists aren’t happy. A shutdown seems unlikely. And other takeaways from Monday’s deal over the gas pipeline.