Riley Beggin

Riley Beggin is Bridge’s Capitol watchdog reporter. She lives in Lansing, where she covers Michigan politics, including legislative, gubernatorial and other state-wide elections. Riley will be reporting stories that aim to shed light on state governance and hold public officials accountable to those they serve. She joined Bridge in January 2018 after working as a digital producer for KPCC, Los Angeles’ NPR member station. Before that, she was a fellow at ABC News’ Washington Bureau, where she reported on the Trump administration, Congress and the State Department. She has interned with NPR’s investigative unit and her freelance work has appeared on NPR, ESPN and more. Riley majored in history and international relations at the University of Wisconsin—Madison. She also holds a master’s degree in investigative journalism from the University of Missouri, where she worked for IRE, the largest organization of investigative reporters in the world. You can reach Riley at rbeggin@bridgemi.com or call her at 517-657-3580.

Articles

Early Michigan governor debates heavy on big ideas, light on details

February 8, 2018 | Riley Beggin

Six months out from the primary, Michigan’s candidates for governor are on the town hall circuit. As for now, they’re still mostly talking in broad strokes.

Michigan prevailing wage law repeal petition will undergo second signature review

January 30, 2018 | Riley Beggin

After a “close call” signature review, the Bureau of Elections suggested the petition move on to a larger sampling process. The Board of Canvassers sided with the Bureau Tuesday.

Abdul El-Sayed says how he would help Michigan cities as governor

January 29, 2018 | Riley Beggin

The former Detroit Health Department director’s plan includes increases in public transportation funding, tax credits and the minimum wage.

Five big things Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder wants done. All of them iffy.

January 25, 2018 | Lindsay VanHulle, Riley Beggin

Snyder begins his final year as a lame duck, wrestling with fellow Republicans on tax cuts, funding for roads, schools and talent. Bridge asked five experts to predict his success.