Children & Families

About 1 in 5 children in Michigan live in poverty. Bridge will explore the reasons behind this disturbing result and the ideas to address it.

Articles

Along Michigan’s back roads, thousands of homeless children

August 12, 2014 | Pat Shellenbarger

Brenda Greenhoe scours abandoned garages and backwoods lots in rural counties, bringing adrift children to school.

A charter school for the rural poor closes

August 12, 2014 | Pat Shellenbarger

Is it better to keep low-income students together despite poor test scores? Or do they benefit from learning alongside middle-class children?

Help Bridge chronicle the challenges facing rural Michigan

August 12, 2014 | David Zeman

Rural communities face a tsunami of modern ills, from fading economies to children who can’t wait to leave. You can help Bridge document the hardship (and joy) of rural life.

Free speech goes begging in Grand Rapids

August 7, 2014 | Ted Roelofs

Across Michigan, communities are trying to craft restrictions on panhandling that don’t run afoul of First Amendment protections.

A day on the streets with a young panhandler

August 7, 2014 | Ted Roelofs

The story behind one man's sign.

Down and out in Lake County

August 5, 2014 | Pat Shellenbarger

Lake County competes for the unwanted title of Michigan’s poorest county. Like many rural areas across the state, Lake residents endure higher poverty, serious health and social ills, and little hope for the future.

Living poor, in a county of wealth

August 5, 2014 | Pat Shellenbarger

Being poor is tough anywhere. But wanting for basics in Livingston County, the state’s most affluent, carries a different kind of sting.

Despite congressional muscle, Michigan ranks near bottom in funding for veterans

March 13, 2014 | Ted Roelofs

Michigan’s congressional delegation controls some powerful defense and intelligence committees. So why does our state rank among the nation’s worst in money paid to veterans?

Self-medicating homeless vets not seeking help they need

March 13, 2014 | Ted Roelofs

Military veterans are more likely to “self-medicate” for pain, both physical and otherwise, leading to a surge in homelessness.

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