Land O Links

"You can't know too much, but you can say too much" -- Calvin Coolidge, president of the United States, 1923-1929.

* The operator of a charter school for Muskegon Heights promises a public meeting a bunch of big changes. Among them: "school days will be longer – 7 ½ hours"; the school year "will include 192 days"; and "the plan for 2013-14 is year-round school, with each new year beginning in mid-August and extending through mid-June."

http://www.mlive.com/news/muskegon/index.ssf/2012/07/muskegon_heights_charter_schoo_7.html

* The tough job market even affects those with Ph.D's in the physical sciences apparently:

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/college_guide/blog/even_the_science_phds_are_in_t.php

* The state superintendent in Indiana is big on charter schools:

http://www.journalgazette.net/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Dato=20120709&Kategori=BLOGS13&Lopenr=120709585&Ref=AR

* Americans increasingly ambivalent about the value of a college education:

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/college_guide/blog/polling_on_the_value_of_colleg.php

 * Natural gas carries an increasing share of the burden in generating electric power for Americans, the federal Energy Information Administration finds. (Hat tip to Circle of Blue blog for chart.) As recently as the early 1990s, coal accounted for about 80 percent ofU.S.power generation; now its share is approaching 50 percent. When policy debates crop up around "fracking" -- the process of breaking up rock formations to release natural gas -- this is the context in which they will occur:

http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=7090

* Speaking of fracking, these maps show how various states regulate the process. Michigan appears to be on the restrictive end of the spectrum:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/wp/2012/07/16/how-states-are-regulating-fracking-in-maps/

 

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Jim
Thu, 07/19/2012 - 9:24am
I hope the Bridge continues information on Muskegon Heights. Charter schools typically oust those students who don't measure up to their standards and the student returns to the local public school, but they now are the local public school. Additionally, charter schools typically serve fewer, and lesser handicapped students, and fewer ESL students. Now however this charter school company is in the same situation as a local school district and has to take and serve all comers. It will be interesting!