The people who want to serve

The Michigan State University Political Leadership Program selects interested citizens for training in how to help their neighbors as public servants. It's a highly successful endeavor. For example, the PLP reports that around half of its graduates are serving or have served in elective or appointed positions around the state.

The PLP just announced its class of 2012, among them John Kaczynski, who is director of the Center for Public Policy & Service at Saginaw Valley State University.

"Ever since high school, I have had a love for public service.  During my years in college, I was involved in various community service activities. Within my current job as a college faculty member, I find my role as a mentor to college students that want to enter the field of public service, a very rewarding experience.  hope to be able to pass on what I learn in MPLP to my undergraduate students," said Kaczynski via email. "To me, MPLP is a lifelong learning program. The program teachers best practices about what it means to be a good public servant. Whether as a state, municipal, or community level public servant; it is important for us to learn about the necessary tools to make positive change.

"The state of Michigan," he continued "greatly benefits from the MPLP program. The program teachers 24 students each year about the "bundle of responsibilities" that go along with being an engaged citizen and community leader. It is this leadership piece about responsibility that resonates with me the most."

Other members of the class are:

Mandy Bolter, of Ada, legislative director for Rep. Peter MacGregor.

Darryle J. Buchanan, of Southfield, president of the Southfield Board of Education.

Michelle Busuito, of Royal Oak,  law clerk for Michigan Supreme Court Justice Diane M. Hathaway. 

Sarah Bydalek, of Grand Rapids, second-term Walker City Clerk.

Theresa Davis, of Metamora, a sergeant in the Lapeer County Sheriff’s Department.

Graham Filler, of Lansing, an assistant attorney general in the state Department of Attorney General Licensing and Regulation Division.

Dandridge Floyd, of Detroit, director of Legal and Labor Affairs for Southfield Public Schools District.

Brad Heffner, of Ithaca, corporate counsel for the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.

William Holley, of Detroit, director of constituent services for state Rep. Rashida Tlaib.

Lena Koretzky, of Bloomfield Hills, a principal, general manager and board member of Vesco Oil Corporation.

Kristina Leonardi, of Davison, senior program analyst with Michigan’s Department of Military and Veterans Affairs.

Jelani McGadney, of Ypsilanti, a senior and student body president at Eastern Michigan University.

Andrew Martin, of Grand Rapids, legislative assistant to House Majority Floor Leader Jim Stamas.

Nolan Moody, of Ann Arbor, a student in his second year of law school.

Kayla North, of Midland, attends Central Michigan University studying political science and sociology, and works at Dow Corning Corporation.

Emily Pontz, of St. Johns, office manager for state Sen. Darwin Booher.

Syed Rob, of Madison Heights, is a multi-line insurance agent, who recently ran for state representative in Michigan’s 28th District.

Scott Russell, of Belleville, works in management at J.D. Power and Associates, specializing in automotive finance analytics.

May Saad, of Dearborn Heights, attorney at Williams, Williams, Rattner & Plunkett, PC.

Nicole Wells Stallworth, of Detroit, director of community outreach and governmental affairs for the Children’s Center of Wayne County.

Ryan Stevens, of Ann Arbor, works at Genpact, Inc., a business consulting firm.

Gregory White, of Detroit, financial analyst for the Detroit field office of the U.S. Office of Strategic Planning and Management.

Angela Wilson, of Okemos, president of the Okemos School District Parent Council.

For more information about the program, click here.

 

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