The status of 39 gun bills in the Michigan Legislature

Most bills are from Republicans seeking to expand gun rights in Michigan. Ten of the 39 bills can be described as gun-control measures, all sponsored by state Democrats.

Of 39 gun bills introduced in the Michigan Legislature this two-year term, most are sponsored by Republicans seeking to expand the rights of gun owners. Ten can be described as gun-control measures, led by Democrats.

Related: Michigan lawmakers treading lightly on guns
Related: Where Michigan governor candidates stand on ‘red flag’ gun bills
Related: Will Florida school shooting nudge Michigan to pass ‘red flag’ gun laws?

Here’s where the bills stand:

House bills

HB 4003

Sponsor: Rep. Peter Lucido, R-Shelby Township
Introduced: Jan. 11, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Exempts someone who is at least 21 years old and is not prohibited from owning a gun from application requirements, including training, to get a concealed pistol license. That person must immediately disclose the concealed pistol if stopped by law enforcement and does not have a license.

HB 4004-06

Sponsor: Rep. Peter Lucido, R-Shelby Township
Introduced: Jan. 11, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Among other things, makes it legal for people to carry a concealed pistol on their bodies or in a vehicle.

HB 4023

Sponsor: Rep. Robert Kosowski, D-Westland
Introduced: Jan. 12, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Creates a school security task force within the Michigan State Police to suggest ways to better protect schools from shooters.

HB 4268

Sponsor: Rep. Tim Kelly, R-Saginaw Township
Introduced: Feb. 23, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Allows people seeking protection under personal protection orders to be exempt from a ban on carrying a concealed firearm in no-carry zones, such as schools, daycare centers and sports arenas.

HB 4416-19

Sponsor: Rep. Michele Hoitenga, R-Manton (4416); Rep. Pamela Hornberger, R-Chesterfield Township (4417); Rep. Sue Allor, R-Wolverine (4418); Rep. Triston Cole, R-Mancelona (4419)
Introduced: March 28, 2017
Status: Passed the House 59-49 (4416 and 4418); 60-48 (4417); 61-47 (4419). Pending in Senate government operations committee since June 13, 2017
What it does: Would allow people to carry a concealed pistol without first having to get a concealed pistol license, so long as the person is not banned from having a gun under state or federal law.

HB 4554

Sponsor: Rep. Lee Chatfield, R-Levering
Introduced: May 2, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Allows people to request their information be removed from a Michigan State Police pistol registry that keeps required records on pistols bought and sold in the state. It is separate from a database of concealed pistol license holders.

HB 4560  

Sponsor: Rep. Abdullah Hammoud, D-Dearborn
Introduced: May 2, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Prohibits someone from having a gun at a police station, so long as the police station has posted signs that say no firearms are allowed on site. That provision would not apply to someone who is turning over a firearm to police as evidence, or to be destroyed.

HB 4565-68

Sponsor: Rep. Gary Glenn, R-Williams Township (4565); Rep. Pamela Hornberger, R-Chesterfield Township (4566); Rep. Beau LaFave, R-Iron Mountain (4567); Rep. Steven Johnson, R-Wayland (4568)
Introduced: May 2, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Removes financial institutions, churches, theaters, sports arenas, daycare centers and hospitals from a list of places at which an individual is not allowed to have a firearm under the state’s penal code.

HB 4616

Sponsor: Rep. Gary Howell, R-North Branch
Introduced: May 17, 2017
Status: Passed the House 69-39. Pending in Senate government operations committee since Sept. 28, 2017
What it does: Prevents cities and towns from enacting gun laws that are more restrictive than state law.

HB 4706-07

Sponsor: Rep. Robert Wittenberg, D-Huntington Woods
Introduced: June 7, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Creates “extreme risk protection orders” that allow for the temporary seizure of guns from someone a court deems to be at risk of harming themselves or others.

HB 4710  

Sponsor: Rep. Jim Ellison, D-Royal Oak
Introduced: June 7, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: The owner of properties where concealed weapons are banned, such as schools, daycare centers and sports stadiums, also can ban someone from openly carrying a gun on the property. The bill would exempt law enforcement, security guards or someone who has the owners’ permission.

HB 4838

Sponsor: Rep. Daire Rendon, R-Lake City
Introduced: July 12, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Allows retired law enforcement officers to carry concealed pistols in no-carry zones.

HB 4842

Sponsor: Rep. Jim Tedder, R-Clarkston
Introduced: July 12, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Allows firefighters and medical first responders to carry concealed pistols in no-carry zones.

HB 4854

Sponsor: Rep. Beau LaFave, R-Iron Mountain
Introduced: July 12, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Allows people with concealed pistol licenses to carry concealed pistols in no-carry zones.

HB 4876

Sponsor: Rep. Triston Cole, R-Mancelona
Introduced: Aug. 16, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Adds exemptions to state law requiring people to get a pistol license before buying or carrying a pistol in Michigan. Exemptions would be added for: spouses, family members and guests of someone licensed to have a pistol, when in the licensed person’s home; and someone who has been licensed to buy, carry, possess or transport a pistol. A House Fiscal Agency analysis says the bill appears to include people whose previous licenses had expired.

HB 4970

Sponsor: Rep. Michele Hoitenga, R-Manton
Introduced: Sept. 19, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Exempts someone honorably discharged from the Army, Air Force, Navy or Marine Corps from needing a concealed pistol license.

HB 5250

Sponsor: Rep. Erika Geiss, D-Taylor
Introduced: Nov. 9, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Requires someone who has a personal protection order issued against them to turn over all guns owned or in their possession if requested by a police officer, or turn them over to law enforcement or sell them to a licensed dealer within 24 hours of being served with the order. That person also can be prevented from buying firearms.

HB 5320

Sponsor: Rep. Triston Cole, R-Mancelona
Introduced: Dec. 5, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Allows a retired Michigan State Police motor carrier officer, who enforce traffic laws for commercial vehicles, to carry a concealed pistol in a no-carry zone.

HB 5369-71  

Sponsor: Rep. Robert Wittenberg, D-Huntington Woods (5369); Rep. Stephanie Chang, D-Detroit (5370); Rep. Jon Hoadley, D-Kalamazoo (5371)
Introduced: Dec. 13, 2017
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Requires federal criminal background checks before a gun purchase.

HB 5414

Sponsor: Rep. Michele Hoitenga, R-Manton
Introduced: Jan. 16, 2018
Status: Pending in House judiciary committee
What it does: Allows lifetime concealed pistol licenses.

Senate

SB 293

Sponsor: Sen. Rebekah Warren, D-Ann Arbor
Introduced: March 30, 2017
Status: Pending in Senate judiciary committee
What it does: Sets criminal penalties for failing to securely lock and store a firearm that ends up in the hands of a minor. Would also require those penalties be displayed at gun stores.

SB 366

Sponsor: Sen. Wayne Schmidt, R-Traverse City
Introduced: May 4, 2017
Status: Passed the Senate 26-11. Pending in House judiciary committee since Nov. 9, 2017
What it does: Allows someone at least 18 years old but younger than 21 years old to apply for a provisional concealed pistol license. The provisional license would be valid only until the applicant’s 21st birthday.

SB 527

Sponsor: Sen. Tom Casperson, R-Escanaba Introduced: Sept. 6, 2017
Status: Passed the Senate 26-11. Pending in House judiciary committee since Nov. 9, 2017
What it does: Among other things, would allow someone to have a gun or ammunition at a foster home if state law permits the person to have a firearm, require the gun to be securely locked on the property when not being legally used, and hold a supervising agency immune from liability if someone is injured as a result of the gun or ammunition stored on the property.

SB 584-86

Sponsor: Sen. Arlan Meekhof, R-West Olive (584); Sen. Phil Pavlov, R-St. Clair Township (585); Sen. Mike Shirkey, R-Clarklake (586)
Introduced: Sept. 20, 2017
Status: Passed the Senate 25-12. Pending in House judiciary committee since Nov. 9, 2017. “Indefinitely on ice,” per committee chair Rep. Jim Runestad, R-White Lake Township
What it does: Allows a concealed pistol license holder to be exempt from a ban against carrying a concealed pistol in a no-carry zone (such as a school) if they meet specific educational requirements, including at least eight hours of training or certification as a firearms instructor. Private property owners still would be allowed to ban someone from carrying pistols on their property.

SB 668

Sponsor: Sen. Rebekah Warren, D-Ann Arbor
Introduced: Nov. 28, 2017
Status: Pending in Senate government operations committee
What it does: Requires someone who has a personal protection order issued against him or her to turn over all guns owned or in his or her possession if requested by a police officer, or turn them over to law enforcement or sell them to a licensed dealer within 24 hours of being served with the order. That person also can be prevented from buying firearms.

Enacted

SB 219 (now Public Act 95 of 2017)

Sponsor: Sen. Mike Green, R-Mayville
Introduced: March 7, 2017
Status: Passed the Senate 27-10. Passed the House 104-3. House changes passed the Senate 32-5. Signed by Gov. Rick Snyder, July 13, 2017. Took effect Oct. 11, 2017.
What it does: The bill, which makes technical changes to how gun records are coordinated with county clerks, was at the request of law enforcement, Snyder spokeswoman Anna Heaton said. The law includes provisions that require a sheriff to notify the clerk if someone is ineligible to receive a concealed pistol license, and prevent a clerk from issuing a license unless state police or a sheriff has found the person applying for the license is not banned from having a gun under federal law.

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Comments

Chuck Fellows
Mon, 03/26/2018 - 8:55am

The Republican tilt appears to be increased access to guns and increased opportunities to carry guns in public places. Question: How do those actions increase public safety and decrease the potential for death by gun?
Please provide evidence, not opinion. My opposition to these measures is based upon the global example that fewer guns in the public sphere leads to reduced death by gun.

Mark Janeczko
Mon, 03/26/2018 - 10:18am

Good question Chuck.

Doug
Tue, 03/27/2018 - 9:56am

Chuck, You are stating an unsupported position as if fact and demanding those opposed disprove it. Please provide evidence supporting your claim that easing of restrictions on lawful carry makes the public less safe.

Carl S
Mon, 04/16/2018 - 2:55am

Is your only measure of public safety deaths by gun? Your claim ‘less guns = less death by guns’ still doesn’t mean less violent crime (based on the global example). Law abiding citizens don’t just go around shooting people.

Paul Jordan
Mon, 03/26/2018 - 12:18pm

If these Republican legislators are so enthusiastic about people carrying concealed weapons, why aren't they clamoring to allow members of the public to carry concealed weapons in the state capitol?
Could it be that--when it is THEIR lives on the line--they recognize that freely carried guns are a potential danger...?

John
Tue, 03/27/2018 - 3:04pm

Paul, check your facts.... it’s already legal to open carry or concealed carry in the state capital.

John S.
Mon, 03/26/2018 - 8:36pm

Michigan citizens are fortunate that most bills die in legislative committees. Most all of these bills will do little or nothing to prevent mass shootings and make Michigan's children safer at school. Let's hope that they die in committee.

Chuck K.
Mon, 04/16/2018 - 10:16am

John S....Thank You....Your comment is short,.. to the point....and completely correct.

Terence Colligan
Sat, 04/14/2018 - 12:55pm

Public safety would be enhanced if the legislature would enact laws banning the cars that cause drunk driving. The democrats, with their involute logic, should be able to see common sense solutions like this to every societal problem that pops up. Right?

Sean Hoydic
Sun, 04/15/2018 - 9:43pm

Good point. Cars have far more energy than bullets.