Marianne Udow-Phillips

Articles

Is the new health-care law what anyone really wants?

March 17, 2017 | Marianne Udow-Phillips

Obamacare is an imperfect system, but key indicators show it’s improving care for many Michiganders. Is the ACHA what we want to replace it with?

Building on Obamacare, warts and all

October 13, 2016 | Marianne Udow-Phillips

Rising premiums, underinsurance and departing providers are certainly problems, but problems that are worth fixing within the existing structure of the ACA

Opioids’ rising death toll demands comprehensive policy solutions

January 8, 2016 | Marianne Udow-Phillips, Theresa R.F. Dreyer

Prescriptions for these powerful drugs are a godsend to those suffering chronic pain. Their interests must be balanced with others’ as we seek to reduce fatal overdoses

From ‘un’ to ‘under:’ Coverage gap is health-insurance challenge

September 11, 2015 | Marianne Udow-Phillips

Getting insurance is only part of the battle. If patients can’t afford their deductibles and co-pays, they can find themselves underinsured, with attendant problems.

In health care costs, Michigan is doing something right

May 29, 2015 | Marianne Udow-Phillips

Compared to two of our Midwestern neighbors, we’re paying less for health care here, probably because of policy and our insurance landscape.

After two years, hard to call ACA anything but a success

March 13, 2015 | Marianne Udow-Phillips

More people are insured. Access is broader. New programs are being tested. And if a Supreme Court challenge is successful, hundreds of thousands could lose their health insurance.

It’s time to move beyond current debate on Obamacare

June 12, 2014 | Marianne Udow-Phillips

Obamacare is already changing the healthcare landscape in Michigan. Major efforts are underway to make the system more effective and efficient, though we don’t yet know if they will work.

Surgery, therapy effective against obesity; more should get both

March 11, 2014 | Marianne Udow-Phillips

Michigan is one of the fattest states in the nation. If we are truly going to tackle obesity and reduce related human suffering and healthcare costs, shouldn’t we focus on things we know work (intensive behavioral therapy and bariatric surgery) and make them widely available to the people who need help most?