Michigan’s Secretary of State promised 30-minute waits — lines are worse

Couple at Secretary of State office

Sheryl and Neil Lightner of Eaton Rapids outside of the Mason Secretary of State branch office, where they had been waiting more than an hour to renew a driver’s license and get new plate tabs. (Bridge photo by Riley Beggin)

MASON—Sheryl and Neil Lightner stepped outside Mason’s packed Secretary of State branch office last Tuesday to grab a smoke. They’d already waited more than an hour to renew a driver's license and get new plate tabs, and there were still 24 people ahead of them.

The Lightners needed to get outside, but they couldn’t really leave.  

“You never know when your number will be called,” Neil Lightner said. “You don’t want to miss it.”

The Lightners have plenty of company. 

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson promised during her 2018 campaign that she'd work to ensure customers at SOS branch offices would wait 30 minutes or less if she was elected. But wait times have increased, at several branches dramatically, in 2019. Average waits were higher nearly every month this year than over the past five years, according to data Bridge Magazine obtained from the department.  

In some of the state’s busiest offices, average wait times now exceed two hours: In Ann Arbor, it was 136 minutes in July; a Livonia office clocked in at 130 minutes in May. Further west, a Battle Creek office reached 90 minutes in February, while Flint’s wait was 98 minutes in June.

Secretary of State wait times grow across much of Michigan

Getting a driver’s license or renewing your plates is taking longer at the 43 busiest branches in the state during the first seven months of 2019 in Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson’s first term. Note: March was excluded because most branches did not have data for that month. Use the search box to find the office nearest you.

Office

 

'19 wait time


(in minutes)
Jan. Feb. April May June July
Adrian Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
54.4
+31
93.7
+68.4
87.4
+50.8
79
+30.4
97.6
+32
88.2
+16.1
Ann Arbor Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
85.1
+17.3
81.3
+14.3
81.9
+8.2
122.4
+29.6
144.6
+46.1
136
+23.4
Battle Creek Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
68.1
+26.9
90
+46.5
74.3
+24.2
94.7
+40
108.2
+64.5
114.6
+40.5
Bay City Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
12.6
+10
40.7
+18.9
46.8
+20.5
52.3
+18.3
31.7
+0.9
37.1
+0.8
Canton Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
103.7
+1.8
137.9
+38.5
124.1
+20.9
78
-33.1
110.4
-9.7
122.6
-26.5
Lansing
East Michigan Ave
Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
50.2
-45.6
61.3
-33.8
no data no data no data no data
Chesterfield Township Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
30.3
+3.5
59.5
+31.3
73.6
+35
75.7
+29.9
76.3
+10.3
73.1
-26.7
Clarkston Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
67.2
+37.5
100.9
+54.6
89.8
+36.3
80.3
+8.3
113.4
+28.2
94.8
+0.5
Clinton Township Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
48.2
+5.4
70.9
+26.7
69.5
+9.2
64.7
-2.3
68.8
-10.6
73.9
-22.2
Clio Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
27.5
+26.5
67.1
+61.1
99.2
+48.1
111.4
+60.8
127.9
+74.6
119.3
+61.7
Davison Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
23.3
+7.2
67.8
+38.5
48.8
+7.6
62.5
-7.5
55.3
-3.6
79.1
+11.8
Detroit
West Grand Blvd
Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
44.6
+6.1
94.5
+35.1
62.3
-20
74.4
+1.8
102.4
+23
130.8
+31.1
Eastpointe Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
73.4
+29.9
124.4
+44.4
75.1
-18.8
85.9
+0
121.9
+37.1
118.5
-10.7
Flint
Fenton Road
Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
46.5
-1.7
83
+24.9
65.1
+9.5
101
+33.6
98
+22.9
118.2
+51.9
Grand Rapids
Plainfield Avenue
Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
35.6
+18.9
49.5
+25.8
49.7
+24.9
45.6
-1.7
59.1
+11.4
66.3
+5.2
Grand Rapids
28th Street
Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
49.6
+9.9
66.5
+26.7
65.1
+17
65.2
+2.3
91.1
+8.1
91.2
-3.2
Holland Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
31
-14.3
48.9
+16
32.3
-17.3
86.9
+16.4
108.8
+46.8
118.6
+30.5
Howell Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
77.5
-0.6
108.9
+54.3
99.6
+7.1
107.8
-9.5
123.1
-4.4
134.2
-17.4
Hudsonville Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
26.2
+26.2
45.2
+21.4
75.8
+38.5
72
+21.4
82.1
+28.3
80.4
+2.5
Jackson Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
69.9
+16.3
72.5
+19.7
67.5
+32.1
79.3
+37.8
107.7
+47
85.4
+6
Kalamazoo Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
60.4
-23.5
77
-3.3
120.1
+23.4
101.9
-14.1
102.6
+3.4
120.8
+5.1
Lansing
Executive Court
Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
33.6
+12.6
50.5
+19.7
43.5
-34.5
65.5
-19
75.4
-20.6
85.3
-10.3
Lapeer Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
19.6
+2.2
64.1
+44.3
90.3
+51.5
99.9
+53.3
74.5
+14.1
122.6
+35.1
Livonia Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
103.2
-19.6
112.3
-7.4
107.1
-7.8
130.5
+1.2
111.2
-14.7
124
-27.5
Marquette Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
11.4
+11.4
12.9
+12.9
30.3
+30.3
34.5
+34.5
30.2
+9.9
35.4
+5.4
Monroe Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
24.6
+24.6
63.4
+63.4
46.5
+29.4
59.2
+19.7
52.1
+9.2
57
+0.8
Muskegon Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
21.8
-1.2
36.9
+9.5
59.9
+23.2
83.2
+23.7
63.2
-10.4
62.7
-29.4
Novi Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
77
+1
101.7
+28.5
95
-39.4
131
+7.8
151
+44.3
182.8
+62.7
Oak Park Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
73.6
+21.4
103.2
+42.5
90.1
+11.8
98.2
+7.6
114
+21.9
156.4
+43.4
Pontiac Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
64.8
-2.7
87.5
+26.6
79
+9.9
89.4
+0.3
103.6
+8.6
96.8
-9.5
Port Huron Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
15.6
+2
61
+30.2
38.5
+1.4
51.8
+2
75.2
+20.4
87
+6.7
Portage Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
53.2
+5.8
81.6
+29.8
81.9
+15.7
113.5
+7.4
125.2
+32.8
123.4
+19
Rochester Hills Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
52.2
-17.4
84.3
+21.9
100.2
+40.7
114.3
+41
143.4
+35.8
149.4
+25.7
Saginaw
Bay Road
Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
20
-6.8
45.3
+18
35.4
+9.4
48.1
+19.6
50.9
+12.5
70.7
+28.1
Shelby Township Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
57.3
+25.5
87
+43.6
96.2
+43
99.8
+29.5
110.2
+20.1
101.4
-19.8
Southfield Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
95.1
+6.8
119
+23.6
70.2
-33.3
92.2
-18
106.1
-3.6
124.4
-7.8
Sterling Heights Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
42.2
+10.2
78.3
+39.4
28.3
-16.1
57.4
+4.4
79.4
+5.2
71
-14.8
Taylor Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
112.9
+41.6
121.5
+43.6
91.1
-15.1
66.5
-27.2
79.3
-23.9
109.3
-19.3
Traverse City Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
23.6
-46.9
45.5
-17.4
47.9
-12.6
70.7
-14.4
47
-47.8
80.6
-36.3
Trenton Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
59.6
+59.6
88.9
+46.7
70.1
-6.8
112.8
+40.8
91.4
+0.7
94.4
+8
Troy Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
101.1
+28.3
107.4
+50.4
116.3
+40.8
112.8
+7.9
129.5
-3
135.8
+10.6
Warren Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
58
-11.2
90
+11.9
80
+4.8
73.8
-25
83.3
-29.8
95.3
-34.2
Wyoming Avg. wait
Ch. from 2018
38.7
-12.4
78.7
+21.9
92.1
+15
81.3
+15.6
103.7
+32
106.6
+27.8

Source: Michigan Secretary of State

Benson and a top SOS official told Bridge they aren’t retreating from that pledge. They say the long waits are a result of years of what they describe as inefficient and inconsistent practices, and that structural changes are being made that may take time to yield results.

“We've seen a lot of short-term solutions over the years that have not been effective in reducing wait times and in some ways have made them longer,” Benson said. The department, she said, is looking for long-term solutions rather than short-term fixes.

In the meantime, she said, customers can ensure they receive help within 30 minutes by booking appointments through the MI-TIME online appointment system, rather than walking in to a branch without an appointment. Those who book a spot are seen quickly, she said.

But overall, wait times won’t come down overnight, said Chief Operations Officer Winnie Liao, a technology and management consultant who joined Benson’s team in January. “It’s going to take some time for us to get where we want to go,” Liao said. 

Among the promised upgrades to reduce frustrating lines is extending the office’s online appointment system to all branch offices, rather than only the state’s busiest offices. Officials say they are also streamlining services for high-volume customers like auto dealers and manufacturers. 

Related: Check out wait times at your Michigan Secretary of State offices

Staff will be held to goal metrics and may undergo more training in order to meet them, which would temporarily take them away from serving customers with the goal of providing better service long-term, Benson said. However, it’s hard to estimate when times will begin to trend down.

Liao also cited other factors contributing to wait times, including understaffing and the crunch of an impending federal deadline to update security measures on residents’ ID cards.

Meanwhile, Michiganders indulge the familiar ritual of squandering their afternoons to update a driver’s license.

Wait times longer, vary by location

Wait times at Michigan Secretary of State offices have been climbing for years. Though they have grown more slowly in 2019 than in the past, they still have grown. Viewed statewide, waits are around 15 minutes longer on average than for the same period last year ‒ from roughly 30 to 45 minutes, records show.

But that average can obscure wild variations depending on the branch. People living in high-population areas are more likely than others to face a hellish wait. 

In southeast Michigan, where wait times are longest, average waits went from about 54 minutes to around 70 or 80 depending on the region. 

Those who frequented the Novi location in July (the state’s busiest branch at one of the busiest times of the year) spent two hours on average waiting to be seen in 2018. In the first seven months of 2019, that climbed to around three hours. 

That’s far longer than waits for Mason branch customers last week. Ed Goodknecht said he had waited around an hour, despite getting a leg up from someone who left the line in desperation and gave him their spot. “It’s ridiculously busy in there,” he said.

How wait times are measured

The Michigan Secretary of State measures wait times at branch offices in two ways. Both methods are a little imperfect:

In the 43 branches equipped with the MI-TIME Line system, people are able to reserve a spot in line online. These tend to be the most high-volume locations. At these branches, wait times are measured from the time a customer joins the online line — whether they’re in the branch or not — to when they’re helped. 

In the other 88 SOS branches, customers can only join the line by pulling a paper number. Five random people throughout the day are selected to be tracked by staff on how long they wait. (The department also uses this method at the 43 highly-trafficked branches in addition to the MI-TIME records). Secretary of State officials said these data tend to be less reliable as they rely on fewer data points. The department is exploring alternatives to this method, officials said.

Part of the frustration for those in busier branches is not knowing how long their wait will last. The part of the MI-TIME online system that estimates wait times at highly trafficked branches has been down since early March, when the department took it offline for improvements, citing inaccuracies. (MI-TIME can still be used to virtually reserve your place in line or make appointments, however.)  

Northern Michiganders have it better at their 20 branches: Those who visited a branch in the Upper Peninsula or northern Lower Peninsula (the state’s least busy regions) in July 2018 experienced average waits of around 10 minutes. In 2019, that time grew to 17 minutes. 

So, what’s going on?

Benson’s office points to numerous obstacles it’s working through.  

The number of branch office workers has decreased significantly over the last several years as a result of cost-saving efforts, Liao said. General Fund appropriations to the department have been cut twice in the last five fiscal years and eight times over the past two decades. 

Ruth Johnson, Benson’s predecessor who is now a state senator, agrees the department is short-staffed, particularly in the busiest branches. “There’s a lot of turnover with new hires because these jobs are very demanding,” she said. “Plus, the economy’s so good right now, a lot of them have other options.”

A shift to more security-conscious identification cards is also contributing to the crunch at branch offices in Michigan and other states, Liao said. Michiganders have an October 2020 deadline to comply with the REAL ID Act, a federal law crafted after the 9/11 terrorist attacks that creates national standards for driver’s licenses and other IDs. While the state has been issuing REAL ID-compliant licenses since 2017, the department expects more people to come in for updates, even if their license is not up for renewal, to avoid security problems at places like airports.

Liao also noted more people use the MI-TIME system to get in line at the state’s 43 busiest branches. While customers like the tool, Liao said making it available only at high-use branches may have had the unintended effect of making those branches even busier. 

“The causes for long wait times differ in almost every one of our offices,” Benson said. 

The big February delay

Customers visiting branch offices in February and March likely faced greater frustration. February 2019 saw a huge spike in waits ‒ a nearly 45 percent increase, compared to a 13 percent increase the year before. 

Officials blame the rollout of the first phase of a $68.6 million new computer system known as “CARS,” which the department uses to process vehicle liens, titles, registrations and renewals electronically. The project has been in process since 2017.

Wait times lengthen

Across Michigan, wait times at secretary of state branch offices have increased in 2019. Hover your cursor or click on an area to see what the regional wait times have been. Note: The data compare waits in January-July 2018 to the same time period in 2019. Also, the Detroit branches, which serve the city as well as Hamtramck, Highland Park, Harper Woods and the Grosse Pointe communities, are in the same region as Macomb County and wait times there are about the same as the rest of Wayne County.

Source: Michigan Secretary of State

Both Benson’s office and former Secretary of State Johnson agree the upgrade is long overdue ‒ staff had been using a decades-old computer system. They also agreed that launching it in February, one of the busiest times of year, was a poor choice and was partially to blame for delays. 

But that’s where the agreement ends. Benson, a Democrat, and Johnson, a Republican, each blame the other for deciding when to roll out the CARS system. 

“The decision was made by the current administration to move forward with the launch of the new system for the vehicle transactions in February,” Johnson told Bridge. “But we’ve heard that maybe it didn’t undergo rigorous enough testing and that there were dozens of issues that didn’t get sorted out until after the fact.”

Liao, Benson’s COO, recalls it differently. “The date was set when we walked in the door … we’re still not sure why the decision was made to launch CARS during one of the busiest seasons of the year,” Liao said. But, she added, “we’ve stopped the bleeding and now we’re working on bringing the wait times down.”

Benson said her office’s eventual success in shortening office lines will depend on a host of improvements, developed over time. 

“We’re trying to avoid making decisions based on what’s going to get us good press and instead making decisions based on what’s going to reduce the wait times, and sometimes those are two different things.”  

Introducing self-service kiosks and expanding the MI-TIME online system isn’t enough to make lasting change, she said. “Reducing wait times means really redefining how we’re delivering state services.”

A big part of that is broadening options for accomplishing tasks usually handled at branch offices. 

Among the department’s priorities:  

  • Extending the MI-TIME appointment system to all of the state’s branch offices
  • Improving the reliability and usefulness of self-serve kiosks (similar to an ATM for renewing tabs)
  • Streamlining services for high-volume customers such as auto dealers
  • Upgrading online services, such as adding a customized list of documents people will need when they arrive for an appointment to its website  

Benson said the appointment system, which is now available at nearly all of the offices, is a guaranteed way to get in and out in 30 minutes already. 

“I’m confident that the improvements we’re talking about and the work that we’re doing is going to collectively get us to where we need to be, which is that goal of the 30-minute guarantee,” Benson said. “We’re going to get there as quickly as possible but we’re going to do it right.”

Johnson said she’s skeptical. She noted that the methodology for measuring wait times is based on averages, which is different than guaranteeing everyone can be in and out of the branch in less than 30 minutes. She questioned whether Benson’s campaign promise is even do-able. 

“It simply is not realistic,” Johnson told Bridge. “So people who come in have this expectation (of being seen in 30 minutes) and then they’re angry at the staff.” She said there will always be unforeseen delays, such as a sick employee or holidays that concentrate traffic in a shortened workweek. 

Benson said she is undeterred. 

"[I am] someone who likes to set high and ambitious expectations and meet them,” she said. “It’s not easy and it’s not always pretty but I think it’s the only way we can get to the real systemic change and modernization that we need to get to.”

 
 

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Comments

Don
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 8:47am

Before Ruth Johnson you could renew on line for FREE>>> She add a charge to renew on line!! And she closed over /1/2 of the offices!!!!

Karen Dunnam
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 8:49am

In general, a birthday in December sucks. Thanks to the last graphic, I am seeing a bright side.
Pro tip: when the SOS mails tab renewal forms a few weeks before your birthday, fill them out and send them back ASAP, or renew on-line. My tabs typically arrive within a week. For a new driver's license you'll have to bring in your face.

pamela roth
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 9:10am

I went to Allegan,closest one to my home. Went in June to get my plates and license renewed. That was 5-hour wait. Then went end of June as we bought a new trailer that was a three-hour wait. Would do it online if the fees were transparent.Does not say what the online charge is..if it does we could not find it. Also, there was never all of the counter people working at the same time. Three total and one would be off doing something else then replace one in an hour or so. If Benson fixed the system she did a really bad job.Also the self serve kiosk did not work..a usual thing.

Chuck Fellows
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 9:25am

Johnson's comment about 30 minutes not being realistic is telling. Of course it is not realistic if you are unwilling to fund a public service (budget cuts). If you are going to effect meaningful change setting expectations and sharing those expectations with the public is called leadership. It is something that also leads to actually defining a problem, like why did the former administration set a major IT change for the busy month ( and then blaming the new administration for the decision - sneaky eh)?
Averages. Not an effective method to assess the performance of a system. Average is meaningless shorthand for those unwilling to study the context from which the averages arise. Understand this, data absent context is meaningless. In order to understand how a process is working and determine how to improve the system you must take the time and effort to understand the context. As the SOS pointed out, where available the appointment system has meet the thirty minute expectation. Also keep in mind, there is no such thing as instant pudding. Read the box (the context).

George
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 12:26pm

Really Chuck? "context" four times. Guess you taught us.

lennie
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 9:28am

It doesn't help that some procedures that might be done by some at home via the internet are laced with fees (just like how the state charges us a fee to file taxes instead of sending in a completed form) and as others are saying, when we do the work at home, there's no savings. In fact you pay more. I've used the online "get in line" system. It works but holy smokes do people look angry at you when they see you walk in and get out in a short time.

Kelly Ripken
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 9:33am

I'll be very interested to see the impact of an SOS, Benson, who believes in government as a force for good in society, rather than one from a party that wants to dismantle government (drown it in the bathtub, etc.) and privatize it. Competent, efficient, caring need to be the watchwords. The wrinkle, of course, is the purse strings are held by the party that denigrates government at every turn, that bashes public servants, even teachers--and so isn't likely to want to fund changes. Benson needs to speak up if her budget isn't enough to cut long lines and inefficiencies.

Joel
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 9:45am

In June I waited 2.75 hours to register a vehicle in Muskegon. This was using the "get in line" feature; registered at 11:00, got waited on at 1:45. I tried to make an appointment, but the first time I was offered was four days away! I have been there several times this year, the only time I waited less than 30 minutes was on a Wednesday evening when I arrived 20 minutes before closing time. The staff is much improved from the "old days", and I feel bad for them as they take a beating daily. We need the Whitehall office re-opened, as one office for a county of 175,000 does not cut it.

George
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 12:22pm

Boot her out next election. Registration costs have skyrocketed and for that we have the privilege of extended wait times.

Kevin Grand
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 12:29pm

"Benson and a top SOS official told Bridge they aren’t retreating from that pledge. They say the long waits are a result of years of what they describe as inefficient and inconsistent practices, and that structural changes are being made that may take time to yield results."

I don't know who she is trying to fool, but I had to take care of a lot of business at the SoS offices this and last year. There was a VERY discernible drop in service after she was sworn into office.

And people expect her to NOT screw up redistricting???

Matt
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 1:12pm

Why would anyone go to the SS office without doing their remote get in line system or setting up an appointment on line. Did it 2 weeks ago still works great.

Paul Jordan
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 1:24pm

They ought to rummage through their old files and dig out the protocols that were put in effect by the late Richard Austin. He made the Secretary of State offices run like a finely tuned machine.

***
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 1:28pm

I have to renew my drivers license and tabs for two cars in the next month or so, I am expecting a long line at the Lansing Frandor location if past experience is any indication. Thankfully I am retired so a long wait isn't going to be too hard to deal with, I don't have to be anywhere else that day.

Anonymous
Tue, 08/13/2019 - 1:45pm

Making an appointment sounds great until you find out that there are no appointments open until next week! I tried making one in July and there weren't any openings until August.

pamela J roth
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 9:25am

I also tried that and it kept saying not available. Allegan has always had horrible wait times and now they seem to be worse no matter what day of the moth or time of the day you go.When I asked the clerk about the not available problem they said the system was probably overwhelmed.

Dr. Richard Zeile
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 8:01am

Apparently Ms. Benson made a promise without a realistic plan. Remember this come next Secretary of State election, and choose performance over promise.

Mike
Fri, 08/16/2019 - 5:14am

What isn’t realistic is expecting the opposition party to fund a plan.

Kevin Grand
Fri, 08/16/2019 - 3:14pm

Didn't SoS Benson consistently remind everyone about the amount of time she spent "preparing" for her job during last year's campaign?

What was it, almost for a decade now?

But, instead of hitting the ground running (especially with a department whose budget was already approved last summer), she let the SoS self-destruct and then implode under her watch.

I cannot help but wonder what else she'll screw up in the next three years.

Beth McElhone
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:30am

Just wanted to say I was in and out in less than 30 minutes a few weeks ago at the Stadium Dr., Secretary of State office in Kalamazoo.

Dave Armstrong
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 1:53pm

If an office has the Timeline service, at least you don't have to go to the office until you're close to the front of the line.
My observation is that the reason they are still so slow, is that they always complain of being understaffed. So not only do they need to improve their Tech, they need to hire more people.

Arjay
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:14pm

Well at least Whitmer didn't tell us when she would fix the roads. My guess is about 3 1/2 years til start.

Geoffrey Owen
Wed, 08/14/2019 - 10:21pm

Sorry officer, I could not get a drivers license or plates for my car. You can give me a ticket but until a system is available to service the needs of drivers in Michigan I guess I won't be able to comply. When you send an office out with a bench warrant for my not showing up in court, maybe he can bring my license and registrations at that time.

James A. Stover
Thu, 08/15/2019 - 8:54am

I was amazed when going to the SOS office. Made on line appointment weeks in advance.
Day of appointment got text reminder, text about 30 min before time make way to office.
Were about 5 ahead of me in check in line, went up to desk, checked my papers issued new tabs and was out the door before my appointment time.
I would say system worked.

Merideth
Thu, 08/15/2019 - 12:06pm

About a decade ago Indiana decided to streamline the BMV, and it got so much better. We then moved from IN to MI and feel like we took a step back! I hope that Benson is also looking towards other states for ideas, because some other states have this figured out.

Rich
Thu, 08/15/2019 - 5:57pm

SOS changes in very recent times have set the SOS operations in a backwards motion. Making appointments via the website used to be easier, and ability to get an appt faster used to be the case. Not any longer. Waiting time to get an appt has increased
Same goes for the website - the SOS noticeably more difficult to navigate. It is difficult to navigate, much more inefficient, and generally a pain compared to what was before. So if web services were added to take away foot traffic from the branches, then the problem is deeper than what appears on the surface. Fact is services has slowed, abilities on the website slowed and cumbersome, what the core problems are about needs to be reviewed going even deeper.

Dave
Fri, 08/16/2019 - 10:08am

Attorney General probably directed offices to process illegal immigrants first?
Voters of the State chose social justice crusader snowflake candidates, what do u expect!

Lori nelson
Sun, 08/18/2019 - 7:51am

If you want to get done quickly show up 45 minutes before closing time. Suddenly three or four people who’ve been in the back all day will show up to process people so they can leave on time. Don’t think it’s a shortage of people as much as a failure to put them where they need to be. Same story at banks, stores, etc. As long as managers let them get away with it people will find places to hide.

David Hogberg
Sun, 08/18/2019 - 11:44am

It’s been my experience at the Albion branch that people waiting are largely unaware of the appointment system. It certainly has worked well for me .

David Hogberg
Sun, 08/18/2019 - 11:44am

It’s been my experience at the Albion branch that people waiting are largely unaware of the appointment system. It certainly has worked well for me .

Recent
Sun, 08/18/2019 - 1:18pm

Waited a couple of hours recently because most of the office was on vacation, shorted staffed. Here's an idea, schedule less renewals in the summer, or force employees to schedule vacations differently. Use technology to schedule appointments, tell customers which offices have shorter wait times. Have a dedicated person who answers questions at each branch, in between customers.

Recent
Sun, 08/18/2019 - 1:18pm

Waited a couple of hours recently because most of the office was on vacation, shorted staffed. Here's an idea, schedule less renewals in the summer, or force employees to schedule vacations differently. Use technology to schedule appointments, tell customers which offices have shorter wait times. Have a dedicated person who answers questions at each branch, in between customers.

Carla Roberts
Mon, 08/19/2019 - 9:54am

It is no longer possible where I live to use the make an appointment function or the options to get in line remotely. It always says nothing is available.