Who’s leading classes? Uncertified teachers for thousands of Michigan kids

classroom

A number of certified teachers haveleft the profession, many frustrated by the high stress and declines in pay and benefits. (Shutterstock image)

Michigan’s public schools are continuing to turn classrooms over to long-term substitute teachers who can have as little as two years of college, according to new state data.

Permits issued this year show the use of long-term subs is on pace to match and most likely exceed last year, when districts used more than 2,500 long-term subs. That was a tenfold increase from four years earlier, a trend that has angered education advocates.

It means another year in which thousands of students will get their math, English and science instruction from non-certified teachers.

“How can you have a quality education when you have people without the tools and background to teach properly?” asked LouAnn Vidmar, a teachers’ union representative in Berrien and Cass counties in southwest Michigan.

So far this year, districts have asked for 1,138 permits for long-term subs. Last year at the same time, districts had requested about 1,000 permits, according to the Citizens Research Council of Michigan, a Livonia-based nonpartisan research firm.

By the end of last school year (2018-19), more than 2,500 long-term subs were used, Bridge reported in August.

Educators and politicians have lamented the use of the subs because most do not have the skills or knowledge that a certified teacher would have.

Michigan schools' long-term subs, 2019-20

Many Michigan school districts are turning to long-term subs for help. Here are all districts that had at least one long-term sub last year and how many permits for long-term subs they've requested through late September of this year. Note: the number of long-term sub permits issued typically grows throughout the year. Type in any portion of a district's name to see how many permits it may have requested so far this year.

District, percent of students considered poor and enrollment Long-term subs
2018-19 2019-20
Dearborn City School District
75.8% poor students
20,740 students
104 57
Detroit Public Schools Community District
85.9% poor students
50,176 students
92 117
Michigan Educational Choice Center
100% poor students
263 students
10 0
Timbuktu Academy
100% poor students
436 students
11 0
Benton Harbor Area Schools
82.9% poor students
1,941 students
41 19
Pathways Academy
98.6% poor students
148 students
5 0
Berkley School District
18.1% poor students
4,377 students
38 7
Lansing Public School District
71.5% poor students
10,652 students
35 16
Brighton Area Schools
13.9% poor students
5,998 students
33 13
Grand Rapids Public Schools
73.7% poor students
16,006 students
31 24
Universal Academy
98.4% poor students
728 students
30 16
Vista Meadows Academy
100% poor students
100 students
7 0
Detroit Service Learning Academy
99.5% poor students
1,350 students
47 0
Eagle's Nest Academy
92.5% poor students
187 students
6 1
Benton Harbor Charter School Academy
89.4% poor students
520 students
16 1
Clarkston Community School District
21.3% poor students
7,334 students
30 3
South Redford School District
67.2% poor students
3,238 students
25 18
Battle Creek Public Schools
83.7% poor students
3,911 students
22 0
Joy Preparatory Academy
99.7% poor students
356 students
16 2
Chandler Park Academy
92.4% poor students
2,199 students
20 2
Eaton Academy
78.6% poor students
346 students
13 3
Flint, School District of the City of
90.4% poor students
4,245 students
22 1
Niles Community Schools
57.9% poor students
3,654 students
19 10
The James and Grace Lee Boggs School
75.2% poor students
137 students
4 0
University Preparatory Academy (PSAD)
82.8% poor students
1,940 students
19 8
Detroit Public Safety Academy
95.1% poor students
286 students
12 3
Midland Academy of Advanced and Creative Studies
31.2% poor students
154 students
8 0
Saginaw, School District of the City of
80.5% poor students
5,452 students
19 10
George Crockett Academy
100% poor students
411 students
13 2
Ojibwe Charter School
82% poor students
100 students
7 1
Detroit Leadership Academy
96.6% poor students
796 students
19 0
Inkster Preparatory Academy
89.4% poor students
180 students
4 0
Public Schools of Calumet, Laurium & Keweenaw
54% poor students
1,519 students
16 0
Saginaw Learn to Earn Academy
98.6% poor students
140 students
4 0
Voyageur Academy
95.7% poor students
1,149 students
29 4
Academy for Business and Technology
88.8% poor students
519 students
18 8
Highland Park Public School Academy System
93.8% poor students
372 students
13 1
Three Lakes Academy
72.4% poor students
116 students
6 1
Universal Learning Academy
82.6% poor students
615 students
19 7
Mildred C. Wells Preparatory Academy
100% poor students
195 students
6 1
Charlton Heston Academy
78.5% poor students
685 students
20 7
Eastpointe Community Schools
79% poor students
2,691 students
15 6
Macomb Montessori Academy
86.6% poor students
201 students
6 2
GEE Edmonson Academy
100% poor students
232 students
5 0
Muskegon, Public Schools of the City of
87.6% poor students
3,589 students
12 0
Garden City Public Schools
60.7% poor students
3,701 students
11 0
American International Academy
90.4% poor students
709 students
6 0
Riverside Academy
99% poor students
999 students
25 4
Bridge Academy
99.5% poor students
773 students
16 11
Detroit Community Schools
99.9% poor students
672 students
13 1
Carrollton Public Schools
78.6% poor students
1,835 students
11 3
Taylor School District
62.3% poor students
6,217 students
11 4
River Rouge, School District of the City of
79.4% poor students
2,279 students
11 2
Waldron Area Schools
66.4% poor students
211 students
8 5
North Saginaw Charter Academy
96.9% poor students
512 students
13 2
Kalamazoo RESA - District created from ISD
52.3% poor students
2,084 students
11 8
International Academy of Saginaw
74.7% poor students
194 students
5 4
Detroit Edison Public School Academy
66.5% poor students
1,287 students
10 8
Grand River Academy
57.6% poor students
788 students
10 3
University Preparatory Science and Math (PSAD)
69.2% poor students
1,479 students
10 14
South Pointe Scholars Charter Academy
51.8% poor students
757 students
9 3
Lansing Charter Academy
89.9% poor students
546 students
9 1
Will Carleton Charter School Academy
26.7% poor students
251 students
6 4
Star International Academy
93.5% poor students
1,562 students
29 16
Hartland Consolidated Schools
16.9% poor students
5,482 students
8 0
Chippewa Valley Schools
29.8% poor students
16,061 students
8 4
Traverse City Area Public Schools
36% poor students
9,433 students
8 7
Keystone Academy
37.4% poor students
779 students
8 1
West Branch-Rose City Area Schools
60.5% poor students
2,043 students
8 0
Kalamazoo Public Schools
71.2% poor students
12,777 students
8 11
Rochester Community School District
11.4% poor students
15,451 students
7 6
Walled Lake Consolidated Schools
26.1% poor students
13,642 students
7 0
Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies (PSAD)
82.3% poor students
1,286 students
8 9
Waterford Montessori Academy
31.1% poor students
309 students
6 0
Conner Creek Academy East
92.8% poor students
932 students
8 3
L'Anse Creuse Public Schools
41.9% poor students
10,392 students
7 1
Harper Woods, The School District of the City of
76.1% poor students
2,349 students
7 3
Joseph K. Lumsden Bahweting Anishnabe Academy
63% poor students
579 students
7 5
Redford Union Schools, District No. 1
76.3% poor students
2,392 students
7 0
ACE Academy (SDA)
100% poor students
186 students
2 0
Avondale School District
45.1% poor students
3,779 students
6 0
Windemere Park Charter Academy
74.9% poor students
637 students
7 4
Tipton Academy
69.9% poor students
508 students
7 0
Oakland International Academy
99.2% poor students
852 students
7 0
Landmark Academy
67.7% poor students
775 students
7 2
Francis Reh PSA
97.8% poor students
455 students
9 3
David Ellis Academy West
69.2% poor students
743 students
7 0
Quest Charter Academy
75.4% poor students
769 students
7 4
Oak Park, School District of the City of
81.4% poor students
4,368 students
6 0
Onekama Consolidated Schools
53.5% poor students
415 students
6 0
Sarah J. Webber Media Arts Academy
88.6% poor students
219 students
2 2
Academy of Warren
95.7% poor students
678 students
7 2
Lighthouse Academy
95.2% poor students
353 students
7 0
West Michigan Aviation Academy
26.5% poor students
611 students
7 3
Hope of Detroit Academy
95.8% poor students
957 students
19 9
Triumph Academy
54.9% poor students
728 students
6 1
Big Bay De Noc School District
69.1% poor students
165 students
5 0
Fortis Academy
79.1% poor students
745 students
6 5
East Arbor Charter Academy
53.2% poor students
694 students
6 4
Laurus Academy
73.4% poor students
744 students
6 1
The Dearborn Academy
99.4% poor students
509 students
13 3
Metro Charter Academy
74.8% poor students
726 students
6 3
Great Oaks Academy
93.2% poor students
734 students
6 1
Detroit Enterprise Academy
96.1% poor students
738 students
6 2
Hillsdale Preparatory School
50% poor students
132 students
3 2
The Woodley Leadership Academy
90.7% poor students
182 students
3 0
LifeTech Academy
51.6% poor students
161 students
2 2
International Academy of Flint
84.3% poor students
917 students
15 4
Paramount Charter Academy
92.7% poor students
451 students
6 4
Trillium Academy
71.2% poor students
594 students
6 3
George Washington Carver Academy
99.6% poor students
537 students
9 0
Flat River Academy
78.8% poor students
146 students
5 1
Dove Academy of Detroit
88.1% poor students
469 students
6 0
West Village Academy
70.8% poor students
353 students
6 1
Countryside Academy
88% poor students
756 students
6 1
Bessemer Area School District
59.1% poor students
408 students
5 1
Flagship Charter Academy
98.1% poor students
698 students
13 6
GEE White Academy
99.7% poor students
374 students
7 0
Bradford Academy
83.2% poor students
1,416 students
6 4
Linden Charter Academy
98.1% poor students
791 students
13 0
Crescent Academy
88.9% poor students
962 students
15 9
Legacy Charter Academy
97.9% poor students
747 students
14 8
Grand Traverse Academy
25.8% poor students
896 students
5 1
Weston Preparatory Academy
90.6% poor students
297 students
4 0
Three Oaks Public School Academy
100% poor students
350 students
6 0
Menominee Area Public Schools
53.9% poor students
1,307 students
5 9
Parchment School District
54.1% poor students
1,603 students
5 2
St. Ignace Area Schools
53.2% poor students
511 students
5 0
Tahquamenon Area Schools
59.9% poor students
599 students
5 1
Ironwood Area Schools of Gogebic County
56.9% poor students
765 students
5 1
Northwest Community Schools
62.3% poor students
3,558 students
5 1
Southgate Community School District
51.7% poor students
3,526 students
5 2
Jackson Public Schools
71% poor students
4,770 students
5 0
Warrendale Charter Academy
98.3% poor students
753 students
5 3
Mid Peninsula School District
65.5% poor students
174 students
4 4
Ann Arbor Public Schools
25% poor students
18,055 students
4 0
Old Redford Academy
75.9% poor students
1,784 students
26 12
Advanced Technology Academy
92.7% poor students
1,296 students
5 4
Detroit Premier Academy
95.7% poor students
770 students
12 6
Martin Luther King, Jr. Education Center Academy
85.6% poor students
397 students
5 5
Cesar Chavez Academy
97.5% poor students
2,291 students
37 6
Copper Country ISD - District created from ISD
74.2% poor students
248 students
5 1
Detroit Innovation Academy
97.2% poor students
393 students
4 1
Bay City Academy
76.2% poor students
365 students
6 0
Grand Ledge Public Schools
28% poor students
5,328 students
4 1
Midland Public Schools
33.2% poor students
7,642 students
4 1
Hancock Public Schools
47.6% poor students
701 students
4 3
Boyne City Public Schools
49.4% poor students
1,349 students
4 0
Sault Ste. Marie Area Schools
55.7% poor students
2,023 students
4 1
Frontier International Academy
98.9% poor students
640 students
8 6
Grand Blanc Community Schools
34.3% poor students
8,260 students
4 2
Greenville Public Schools
56.7% poor students
3,729 students
4 1
North Branch Area Schools
47.4% poor students
2,353 students
4 0
Alcona Community Schools
67.6% poor students
686 students
4 5
Arts and Technology Academy of Pontiac
76.6% poor students
843 students
5 5
Taylor Exemplar Academy
71% poor students
792 students
4 2
Warren Consolidated Schools
64.7% poor students
13,767 students
4 2
Distinctive College Prep.
89.7% poor students
465 students
4 6
Benzie County Central Schools
59.5% poor students
1,414 students
4 0
Dollar Bay-Tamarack City Area K-12 School
51.9% poor students
337 students
4 0
Harper Creek Community Schools
41% poor students
2,828 students
4 0
Holton Public Schools
70.6% poor students
837 students
4 0
Canton Charter Academy
18.8% poor students
749 students
4 2
Jonesville Community Schools
52.6% poor students
1,446 students
4 1
Flextech High School Shepherd
60% poor students
35 students
1 1
Monroe Public Schools
60.7% poor students
5,232 students
4 3
Romulus Community Schools
75.7% poor students
2,577 students
4 0
Michigan International Prep School
67% poor students
449 students
2 0
Ypsilanti Community Schools
65.3% poor students
3,840 students
4 5
Charyl Stockwell Academy
16.2% poor students
1,118 students
4 3
Beecher Community School District
93% poor students
755 students
4 0
Summit Academy North
66.3% poor students
1,842 students
4 0
Hope Academy
87.6% poor students
534 students
4 2
Michigan Mathematics and Science Academy
99.8% poor students
817 students
13 5
Birmingham Public Schools
8.8% poor students
8,072 students
3 0
Burton Glen Charter Academy
97.2% poor students
599 students
4 0
Jalen Rose Leadership Academy
90.3% poor students
413 students
4 2
Muskegon Heights Public School Academy System
93.5% poor students
644 students
3 16
Multicultural Academy
92.4% poor students
171 students
3 1
Plymouth Scholars Charter Academy
12.5% poor students
769 students
3 0
Plymouth-Canton Community Schools
20.5% poor students
17,491 students
3 2
Hamilton Community Schools
27.1% poor students
2,729 students
3 1
Mattawan Consolidated School
18% poor students
3,756 students
3 0
Grosse Pointe Public Schools
18.8% poor students
7,652 students
3 1
Oxford Community Schools
24.7% poor students
5,589 students
3 1
Whiteford Agricultural School District of the Counties of Lenawee and Monroe
28.5% poor students
752 students
3 0
Lakeview Public Schools (Macomb)
42.4% poor students
4,375 students
3 0
Davison Community Schools
44.3% poor students
5,723 students
3 1
Howell Public Schools
27.4% poor students
6,973 students
3 2
Gull Lake Community Schools
23.8% poor students
3,231 students
3 0
Elkton-Pigeon-Bay Port Laker Schools
51% poor students
914 students
3 2
Croswell-Lexington Community Schools
52.4% poor students
2,148 students
3 0
Stockbridge Community Schools
40.8% poor students
1,249 students
3 0
Hemlock Public School District
32.3% poor students
1,213 students
3 2
Iron Mountain Public Schools
48.9% poor students
883 students
3 1
Posen Consolidated School District No. 9
59.6% poor students
213 students
3 2
Ontonagon Area School District
52% poor students
275 students
3 3
Britton Deerfield Schools
51.4% poor students
533 students
3 0
Mancelona Public Schools
71.3% poor students
936 students
3 3
Eaton Rapids Public Schools
55.3% poor students
2,296 students
3 2
Lamphere Public Schools
50.6% poor students
2,484 students
3 2
Montague Area Public Schools
49.7% poor students
1,514 students
3 0
Bay City School District
52.5% poor students
7,504 students
3 1
Onaway Area Community School District
56.8% poor students
604 students
3 0
Alpena Public Schools
58% poor students
3,753 students
3 1
Warren Woods Public Schools
58.3% poor students
3,244 students
3 0
Breckenridge Community Schools
54.6% poor students
668 students
3 0
Oakridge Public Schools
63.6% poor students
2,042 students
3 1
Grant Public School District
57.2% poor students
1,799 students
3 3
Pellston Public Schools
69.9% poor students
495 students
3 4
Cassopolis Public Schools
60.7% poor students
957 students
3 0
Vista Charter Academy
93.7% poor students
702 students
3 0
Hanley International Academy
94.6% poor students
647 students
3 1
Huron Academy
61% poor students
620 students
3 0
Reach Charter Academy
91.3% poor students
652 students
3 2
Kalkaska Public Schools
65.1% poor students
1,472 students
3 2
Coloma Community Schools
73.9% poor students
1,341 students
3 0
South Lake Schools
66.8% poor students
1,619 students
3 0
Carney-Nadeau Public Schools
64.1% poor students
287 students
3 3
Madison Academy
86% poor students
414 students
3 3
Shelby Public Schools
71.7% poor students
1,265 students
3 4
Pembroke Academy
93% poor students
244 students
3 2
Caniff Liberty Academy
99% poor students
481 students
3 0
Hillman Community Schools
67.4% poor students
411 students
3 0
Clintondale Community Schools
79.5% poor students
2,725 students
3 1
Endeavor Charter Academy
84.2% poor students
679 students
3 1
Westwood Heights Schools
92.2% poor students
1,510 students
3 0
Dr. Joseph F. Pollack Academic Center of Excellence
82.2% poor students
835 students
3 2
Escuela Avancemos
98.3% poor students
301 students
3 0
Nah Tah Wahsh Public School Academy
88.2% poor students
186 students
3 0
State Street Academy
82.5% poor students
120 students
2 0
Greater Heights Academy
97.3% poor students
262 students
5 1
Ecorse Public Schools
81.7% poor students
1,055 students
3 5
MacDowell Preparatory Academy
98.6% poor students
366 students
3 2
Pontiac Academy for Excellence
75.3% poor students
774 students
3 0
Powell Township Schools
62.9% poor students
35 students
2 0
Mid-Michigan Leadership Academy
98.7% poor students
238 students
3 0
Detroit Merit Charter Academy
92.3% poor students
737 students
12 3
Oakside Scholars Charter Academy
92.8% poor students
739 students
11 7
Covenant House Academy Detroit
96.2% poor students
501 students
3 5
Lewis Cass ISD - District created from ISD
64.4% poor students
284 students
3 1
Midland County Educational Service Agency - District created from ISD
66.4% poor students
1,775 students
3 2
Montcalm Area ISD - District created from ISD
51.8% poor students
525 students
3 0
Lenawee ISD - District created from ISD
57.7% poor students
596 students
3 0
Ottawa Area ISD - District created from ISD
50.1% poor students
1,426 students
3 3
Calhoun Intermediate School District - District created from ISD
60.3% poor students
1,208 students
3 0
Lakeside Charter School - Kalamazoo
99.6% poor students
244 students
4 1
Achieve Charter Academy
14.3% poor students
763 students
2 3
Forest Hills Public Schools
11.8% poor students
9,774 students
2 0
St. Joseph Public Schools
31% poor students
3,003 students
2 2
South Canton Scholars Charter Academy
27.2% poor students
780 students
2 3
Lakeshore School District (Berrien)
30.7% poor students
2,785 students
2 2
Merritt Academy
50.4% poor students
552 students
2 3
Jenison Public Schools
30.9% poor students
5,094 students
2 0
Grand Blanc Academy
88% poor students
384 students
6 3
Zeeland Public Schools
26.2% poor students
6,241 students
2 0
Linden Community Schools
27.1% poor students
2,713 students
2 1
East Lansing School District
33.9% poor students
3,607 students
2 1
New Lothrop Area Public Schools
24.7% poor students
916 students
2 1
Crawford AuSable Schools
56.9% poor students
1,571 students
2 2
Plainwell Community Schools
29% poor students
2,780 students
2 2
Livonia Public Schools School District
33.8% poor students
14,184 students
2 1
Huron Valley Schools
27.3% poor students
8,987 students
2 0
Royal Oak Schools
23.6% poor students
4,995 students
2 1
Farmington Public School District
26.2% poor students
9,539 students
2 1
West Bloomfield School District
34.6% poor students
5,476 students
2 0
Hamtramck Academy
98.3% poor students
537 students
2 1
Charlevoix Public Schools
43.9% poor students
872 students
2 1
Breitung Township School District
43.1% poor students
1,893 students
2 0
Gobles Public School District
58.3% poor students
772 students
2 0
Concord Academy - Boyne
44.3% poor students
158 students
2 1
West Ottawa Public School District
55% poor students
6,712 students
2 0
Crossroads Charter Academy
57.1% poor students
595 students
2 0
Laingsburg Community Schools
27.4% poor students
1,125 students
2 0
Saginaw Township Community Schools
47.9% poor students
4,803 students
2 0
Manistique Area Schools
56.5% poor students
816 students
2 0
Reeths-Puffer Schools
45.7% poor students
3,710 students
2 0
Knapp Charter Academy
68.9% poor students
745 students
2 1
Kentwood Public Schools
72.7% poor students
9,284 students
2 0
Three Rivers Community Schools
56.4% poor students
2,564 students
2 0
Four Corners Montessori Academy
35.4% poor students
441 students
2 0
Clio Area School District
53.5% poor students
2,918 students
2 0
Michigan Connections Academy
57.3% poor students
1,722 students
2 1
Holland City School District
64.5% poor students
3,364 students
2 0
Pinckney Community Schools
20% poor students
2,602 students
2 1
Buckley Community Schools
49.1% poor students
409 students
2 2
Shepherd Public Schools
47.2% poor students
1,811 students
2 0
Kingston Community School District
56.6% poor students
595 students
2 0
Ellsworth Community School
54.3% poor students
256 students
2 1
Lawrence Public Schools
64.6% poor students
570 students
2 3
South Arbor Charter Academy
22.5% poor students
796 students
2 1
Wyandotte, School District of the City of
57.9% poor students
4,792 students
2 0
Corunna Public Schools
53.8% poor students
1,811 students
2 1
Camden-Frontier School
58.7% poor students
504 students
2 3
Ewen-Trout Creek Consolidated School District
55.5% poor students
191 students
2 2
L'Anse Area Schools
63.1% poor students
605 students
2 3
Reese Public Schools
51.1% poor students
805 students
2 0
Brimley Area Schools
59.1% poor students
536 students
2 0
Farwell Area Schools
61.2% poor students
1,158 students
2 0
Morenci Area Schools
62.5% poor students
650 students
2 2
Suttons Bay Public Schools
57.2% poor students
612 students
2 0
North Star Academy
58.4% poor students
267 students
2 6
Colon Community School District
54.7% poor students
550 students
2 2
Houghton Lake Community Schools
76.8% poor students
1,249 students
2 1
Engadine Consolidated Schools
69.9% poor students
359 students
2 0
Mendon Community School District
52.5% poor students
510 students
2 2
Mio-AuSable Schools
73.4% poor students
533 students
2 2
Harrison Community Schools
78.1% poor students
1,418 students
2 1
Peck Community School District
60.5% poor students
349 students
2 0
Northport Public School District
65.2% poor students
141 students
2 2
Marshall Academy
57.7% poor students
272 students
2 0
Noor International Academy
66.2% poor students
154 students
2 3
Carman-Ainsworth Community Schools
81.7% poor students
4,708 students
2 0
Lake City Area School District
65.7% poor students
1,166 students
2 1
AGBU Alex-Marie Manoogian School
55.4% poor students
399 students
2 1
Island City Academy
27.9% poor students
204 students
2 0
American Montessori Academy
65.4% poor students
486 students
2 4
Van Buren Public Schools
57.6% poor students
4,603 students
2 0
Baldwin Community Schools
95.3% poor students
515 students
2 1
Fitzgerald Public Schools
69% poor students
2,546 students
2 1
Walton Charter Academy
93.6% poor students
815 students
2 0
Ashley Community Schools
71.4% poor students
259 students
2 0
Walden Green Montessori
38.8% poor students
245 students
2 0
River City Scholars Charter Academy
92.9% poor students
477 students
2 0
Lincoln Park, School District of the City of
72.7% poor students
4,804 students
2 0
Bangor Public Schools (Van Buren)
76.1% poor students
1,118 students
2 0
Southwest Detroit Community School
93.8% poor students
386 students
2 0
Regent Park Scholars Charter Academy
98.1% poor students
749 students
12 4
East Jackson Community Schools
64.7% poor students
940 students
2 3
Old Mission Peninsula School
19.4% poor students
134 students
3 0
Woodland Park Academy
80.6% poor students
386 students
2 2
David Ellis Academy
92.8% poor students
304 students
2 6
Marvin L. Winans Academy of Performing Arts
93.5% poor students
520 students
2 0
Saginaw Preparatory Academy
97.1% poor students
308 students
2 3
Pansophia Academy
81.6% poor students
419 students
2 1
Plymouth Educational Center Charter School
84.2% poor students
507 students
2 1
New Paradigm Glazer-Loving Academy
99.4% poor students
341 students
3 0
Charlevoix Montessori Academy for the Arts
76.2% poor students
42 students
2 3
Hope Academy of West Michigan
92.5% poor students
371 students
2 1
Insight School of Michigan
74% poor students
769 students
2 0
Central Academy
90.4% poor students
605 students
7 2
Sanilac ISD - District created from ISD
69.1% poor students
317 students
2 0
St. Joseph County ISD - District created from ISD
55.7% poor students
474 students
2 1
Shiawassee Regional ESD - District created from ISD
62.7% poor students
598 students
2 3
Saginaw ISD - District created from ISD
63.7% poor students
837 students
2 0
Chandler Woods Charter Academy
21.8% poor students
779 students
1 2
Haslett Public Schools
26% poor students
2,685 students
1 0
Houghton-Portage Township School District
30.1% poor students
1,409 students
1 1
Hudsonville Public School District
20.4% poor students
6,855 students
1 0
Dexter Community School District
11.3% poor students
3,661 students
1 0
Williamston Community Schools
22.4% poor students
1,879 students
1 0
Bedford Public Schools
19.9% poor students
4,324 students
1 2
Grand Haven Area Public Schools
32% poor students
6,064 students
1 1
Les Cheneaux Community Schools
46.9% poor students
224 students
1 1
Walker Charter Academy
45.2% poor students
739 students
1 1
Grandville Public Schools
21.8% poor students
5,666 students
1 0
Edwardsburg Public Schools
31.5% poor students
2,742 students
1 4
Coopersville Area Public School District
41.4% poor students
2,655 students
1 0
Almont Community Schools
25.5% poor students
1,456 students
1 0
Chesaning Union Schools
52.4% poor students
1,447 students
1 0
St. Johns Public Schools
34.7% poor students
2,799 students
1 1
Romeo Community Schools
24.7% poor students
5,042 students
1 0
Kingsbury Country Day School
9.3% poor students
291 students
1 0
Utica Community Schools
38.1% poor students
26,894 students
1 0
Fairview Area School District
73.8% poor students
298 students
1 1
Charlotte Public Schools
43.2% poor students
2,467 students
1 0
Whitehall District Schools
45.2% poor students
2,078 students
1 0
Nottawa Community School
31.9% poor students
116 students
1 2
Grass Lake Community Schools
28.3% poor students
1,294 students
1 0
North Dickinson County Schools
47.6% poor students
250 students
1 0
East China School District
32.8% poor students
4,102 students
1 0
Chassell Township School District
35.7% poor students
263 students
1 0
Byron Area Schools
37.2% poor students
835 students
1 0
Fraser Public Schools
45.4% poor students
4,978 students
1 0
River Valley School District
56.9% poor students
578 students
1 1
Lake Fenton Community Schools
28.9% poor students
2,078 students
1 0
Hanover-Horton School District
36.7% poor students
1,135 students
1 0
Mona Shores Public School District
48.2% poor students
3,895 students
1 1
Mt. Clemens Montessori Academy
37.4% poor students
326 students
1 0
Clawson Public Schools
38% poor students
1,556 students
1 0
Martin Public Schools
54.3% poor students
613 students
1 2
Paragon Charter Academy
62.1% poor students
678 students
1 6
Ubly Community Schools
45.9% poor students
651 students
1 0
Dansville Schools
31.2% poor students
730 students
1 1
Clinton Community Schools
35% poor students
1,221 students
1 0
Sand Creek Community Schools
44.9% poor students
842 students
1 0
Creative Technologies Academy
37.7% poor students
318 students
1 0
Concord Academy - Petoskey
53.9% poor students
180 students
1 0
Livingston Classical Academy
13.8% poor students
210 students
1 3
Beal City Public Schools
29.4% poor students
684 students
1 0
Clare Public Schools
50.4% poor students
1,614 students
1 2
Mar Lee School District
51.5% poor students
303 students
1 1
Cheboygan Area Schools
61.2% poor students
1,563 students
1 0
Gladwin Community Schools
57.7% poor students
1,680 students
1 1
Brandon School District in the Counties of Oakland and Lapeer
38.3% poor students
2,380 students
1 0
Essexville-Hampton Public Schools
30.3% poor students
1,717 students
1 0
Lake Shore Public Schools (Macomb)
48% poor students
3,493 students
1 0
Riverview Community School District
45.3% poor students
2,873 students
1 0
Perry Public Schools
45.6% poor students
1,092 students
1 0
Fowlerville Community Schools
38.8% poor students
2,802 students
1 0
Manton Consolidated Schools
58.7% poor students
952 students
1 0
Lakeview Sch. District (Calhoun)
54.9% poor students
4,075 students
1 0
Pinconning Area Schools
53.7% poor students
1,267 students
1 1
Big Rapids Public Schools
51.5% poor students
2,061 students
1 0
Centreville Public Schools
46.3% poor students
844 students
1 1
Quincy Community Schools
49.9% poor students
1,215 students
1 0
Norway-Vulcan Area Schools
45.9% poor students
686 students
1 1
Genesee School District
85.4% poor students
669 students
1 1
Constantine Public School District
56.6% poor students
1,449 students
1 5
Leelanau Montessori Public School Academy
54.7% poor students
64 students
1 0
Escanaba Area Public Schools
54.9% poor students
2,329 students
1 0
Branch Line School
43.7% poor students
142 students
1 0
Swartz Creek Community Schools
53.7% poor students
3,636 students
1 2
Chippewa Hills School District
60.3% poor students
1,959 students
1 1
Crestwood School District
76.4% poor students
3,966 students
1 0
New Haven Community Schools
52.1% poor students
1,260 students
1 0
Creative Montessori Academy
59.2% poor students
765 students
1 2
Fremont Public School District
52.9% poor students
2,139 students
1 0
Mason County Eastern Schools
76.7% poor students
437 students
1 3
Akron-Fairgrove Schools
75.2% poor students
314 students
1 2
Webberville Community Schools
54.4% poor students
524 students
1 0
Cross Creek Charter Academy
32.5% poor students
781 students
1 1
Union City Community Schools
56.9% poor students
1,040 students
1 0
South Haven Public Schools
61.3% poor students
1,987 students
1 0
Ferndale Public Schools
60.7% poor students
3,099 students
1 1
Michigan Center School District
50.6% poor students
1,400 students
1 1
Oscoda Area Schools
70% poor students
1,146 students
1 2
Vassar Public Schools
71.2% poor students
1,088 students
1 0
Adrian Public Schools
63.6% poor students
2,837 students
1 0
Rudyard Area Schools
71.5% poor students
614 students
1 0
Vestaburg Community Schools
57.2% poor students
717 students
1 0
Addison Community Schools
55.8% poor students
830 students
1 0
White Pigeon Community Schools
58.4% poor students
755 students
1 1
Northridge Academy
100% poor students
198 students
1 3
Wyoming Public Schools
80.6% poor students
4,152 students
1 1
Hart Public School District
71.7% poor students
1,353 students
1 0
Baraga Area Schools
56% poor students
348 students
1 2
Ishpeming Public School District No. 1
54.9% poor students
760 students
1 0
Kaleva Norman Dickson School District
75.8% poor students
516 students
1 2
Carson City-Crystal Area Schools
57.9% poor students
941 students
1 2
Wakefield-Marenisco School District
55.2% poor students
286 students
1 1
Owosso Public Schools
60.5% poor students
3,114 students
1 1
Port Huron Area School District
55.7% poor students
8,194 students
1 1
Merrill Community Schools
57% poor students
581 students
1 2
Hillsdale Community Schools
58.9% poor students
1,353 students
1 0
Central Montcalm Public Schools
67.3% poor students
1,513 students
1 0
Whittemore-Prescott Area Schools
85.7% poor students
747 students
1 0
White Pine Academy
50.7% poor students
75 students
1 0
Roseville Community Schools
61.7% poor students
4,631 students
1 2
Melvindale-North Allen Park Schools
86.7% poor students
3,135 students
1 1
Burt Township School District
72.7% poor students
33 students
1 0
Evart Public Schools
71.9% poor students
898 students
1 0
Prevail Academy
89.1% poor students
589 students
1 0
Dowagiac Union School District
74.5% poor students
2,188 students
1 0
Dearborn Heights School District #7
76.7% poor students
2,507 students
1 0
Bloomingdale Public School District
81% poor students
1,164 students
1 0
Homer Community School District
54.5% poor students
1,025 students
1 1
Hartford Public Schools
84.5% poor students
1,365 students
1 0
Bellevue Community Schools
62.5% poor students
600 students
1 0
Burr Oak Community School District
73.9% poor students
287 students
1 0
Gateway To Success Academy
82.8% poor students
122 students
1 1
Hesperia Community Schools
72.6% poor students
899 students
1 0
Bentley Community School District
67.9% poor students
836 students
1 0
Renaissance Public School Academy
58.5% poor students
431 students
1 0
Marion Public Schools
66.3% poor students
421 students
1 3
The New Standard Academy
96% poor students
581 students
1 5
Alanson Public Schools
63.9% poor students
219 students
1 3
Watersmeet Township School District
78.4% poor students
134 students
1 0
Pittsford Area Schools
60.5% poor students
453 students
1 0
Godfrey-Lee Public Schools
95.4% poor students
1,840 students
1 2
Global Heights Academy
100% poor students
261 students
1 5
Battle Creek Montessori Academy
72.2% poor students
180 students
1 0
Hamtramck, School District of the City of
94.4% poor students
3,300 students
1 1
Walkerville Public Schools
82.9% poor students
263 students
1 0
Van Dyke Public Schools
88.3% poor students
2,355 students
1 0
Mt. Morris Consolidated Schools
82.7% poor students
1,827 students
1 3
Momentum Academy
89.4% poor students
216 students
1 1
Hazel Park, School District of the City of
66.4% poor students
3,271 students
1 0
Bridgeport-Spaulding Community School District
84.2% poor students
1,565 students
1 2
Da Vinci Institute
74.7% poor students
446 students
1 1
Timberland Academy
96.7% poor students
729 students
1 2
Innocademy
30.3% poor students
340 students
6 2
Great Lakes Academy
91.4% poor students
151 students
1 0
Clara B. Ford Academy (SDA)
99.2% poor students
131 students
1 0
Capstone Academy Charter School (SDA)
98.9% poor students
185 students
1 0
Casman Alternative Academy
90.7% poor students
75 students
1 1
Cornerstone Health and Technology School
88.8% poor students
556 students
1 0
Academic and Career Education Academy
78.7% poor students
108 students
1 0
Bay-Arenac Community High School
72.7% poor students
172 students
1 1
Taylor Preparatory High School
64.9% poor students
433 students
1 0
Arts Academy in the Woods
56.5% poor students
352 students
1 2
Henry Ford Academy
54.2% poor students
515 students
1 0
NexTech High School
66.2% poor students
133 students
1 1
NexTech High School of Lansing
46.7% poor students
169 students
1 1
New School High
12.2% poor students
82 students
1 1
Gogebic-Ontonagon ISD - District created from ISD
51.3% poor students
117 students
1 0
C.O.O.R. ISD - District created from ISD
71.4% poor students
318 students
1 0
Manistee ISD - District created from ISD
82.2% poor students
73 students
1 2
Kent ISD - District created from ISD
57.3% poor students
2,918 students
1 0
Cheb-Otsego-Presque Isle ESD - District created from ISD
51.1% poor students
307 students
1 0
Clare-Gladwin Regional Education Service District - District created from ISD
61.5% poor students
379 students
1 0
Newaygo County RESA - District created from ISD
55.7% poor students
465 students
1 0
Allegan Area Educational Service Agency - District created from ISD
48.6% poor students
426 students
1 0
Branch ISD - District created from ISD
58.3% poor students
551 students
1 2
St. Clair County RESA - District created from ISD
69.5% poor students
600 students
1 0
Berrien RESA - District created from ISD
64.4% poor students
800 students
1 0
Ingham ISD - District created from ISD
60.9% poor students
1,365 students
1 1
Jackson ISD - District created from ISD
64% poor students
1,215 students
1 0
Genesee ISD - District created from ISD
65.9% poor students
3,744 students
1 1

Students from two Detroit charter schools told Bridge that they turned to the Internet to teach themselves or had lost interest in some subjects because of the poor quality of their long-term subs.

“(T)here remains an existential teacher shortage dilemma in Michigan and too many long-term substitute teachers are serving in place of trained and effective educators,” state education spokesman Martin Ackley wrote in an email to Bridge. 

“We all need to work together to attract and retain educators to the profession and ensure every child in Michigan has access to a quality education.”

Many long-term subs have four-year college degrees, though not education degrees. But state rules allow districts to hire people with as few as 60 college credits, or two years of school.

Data show that enrollment in Michigan’s teacher-prep programs fell 66 percent between 2009 and 2016 and while there are enough students graduating from Michigan’s university-based teaching programs to replace teachers who retire and quit, they are not evenly distributed geographically or by teaching specialty, according to a report by the Citizens Research Council of Michigan.

And a number of certified teachers have simply left the profession, many frustrated by the high stress and declines in pay and benefits.

Molly Sweeney, organizing director for 482Forward, a Detroit-based nonprofit that works to empower student leaders, said most of the applicants for recent jobs at her nonprofit have been teachers early in their careers who wanted to get out because it was “too chaotic.”

The result has been a shrinking teacher talent pool that in many areas, like Detroit, is forcing districts to turn to non-teachers to teach. Facing its own hiring crisis, the Detroit Community Schools boosted pay and offered $3,000 hiring bonuses to gain certified teachers. 

But many of those new hires came from Detroit-area charter schools, where pay is typically lower, forcing many of those schools to turn to long-term subs: Although charters educate roughly 10 percent of state students, over half of all long-term subs worked in charter schools.

The Michigan Association of Public School Academies has been well aware of the growing problem with hiring and retaining teachers for a number of years, said Angi Beland, a former MAPSA employee who is program director of its alternative-certification program.

Through the program, would-be teachers who already have a college degree take 13 months of education-related classes. The program, like others around the state and approved by the Michigan Department of Education, targets those already working in charters, like classroom aides, who would want to become teachers.

MAPSA’s “professional innovators and teachers” program currently has 45 people enrolled –  charter schools typically cover the cost – and Beland expects 30 more applications.

That’s not enough to solve the problem statewide, but it is helping. “The ideal would be we would have all certified teachers,” she said. “It’s how do we make the best of a bad situation.”

Some traditional public schools also turn to long-term subs: Detroit schools, which made hiring certified teachers a priority, has pulled permits for 117 full-year long-term subs so far in the 2019-20 school year, up from 92 for all of 2018-19. 

Overall the district has over 3,500 teachers and is the largest district in Michigan.

In West Michigan, the troubled Benton Harbor schools are facing budget and academic woes that caused Gov. Gretchen Whitmer to consider shutting down the high school there.

Last year the district hired 41 long-term subs, equal to over 40 percent of its staff. So far this year, the district has asked for 19 permits –  and still has seven teaching openings.

The long-term solution, Sweeney, Vidmar and others said, requires more support for the teaching profession to encourage more people to go into the profession. Over the years, teachers have seen salaries stagnate and pension and health-care benefits trimmed as Michigan struggled with the fallout of the Great Recession as incomes –  and taxes – fell precipitously.

Like what you’re reading in Bridge? Please consider a donation to support our work!

We are a nonprofit Michigan news site focused on issues that impact all citizens. In an era of click bait and biased news, we focus on taking the time to learn both sides of a story before we post it. Bridge stories are always free, but our work costs money. If our journalism helps you understand and love Michigan more, please consider supporting our work. It takes just a moment to donate here.

Pay with VISA Pay with MasterCard Pay with American Express Donate now

Comment Form

Add new comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Comments

duane
Thu, 10/10/2019 - 11:05am

Does certification ensure the quality or effectiveness of performance?
Is every certified teacher in Michigan schools performing as well as some of the long-term substitute teachers?
Should the issue we are hearing about be the learning success of the students in the classroom and how the teacher is affecting that success?

Ed Haynor
Thu, 10/10/2019 - 1:05pm

Ok, using your reasoning, why should doctors, lawyers and other professionals be certified?

duane
Thu, 10/10/2019 - 9:30pm

It seems you are avoiding the question by asking another question, that's okay just so we all recognize it.
My point is not about certifying, rather it is to recognize the limitations of certification and not try to distort the conversation so what is important is not discussed.
Whatever the profession, doctors, lawyer, engineers, technicians, cosmetologist, teachers, certification provides two benefits; it creates a threshold of effort that discourages many that lack the commitment, the ability to learn, the willingness to continue learning. Second it demonstrates a minimum level of knowledge and skills at a point in time. I want to know when I visit a doctor that they are likely to have a minimum knowledge of medical care, similarly for a teacher I want to have confidence they have a minimum knowledge of the subject and the means and methods to deliver that information.
Desire results may require more than what is certified. If the results involve more than what is certified than we need to consider what certification does not verify. Certifications are not designed to assess/certify; inter personal skills, such as empathy or inclusion or adaptability to the individual being served, and other individual accommodations necessary to deliver desired results . These are all important when the person being served has a key role in achieving the desired results. Using your example of a certified doctor that may not be effective; if the patient has a role in the implementation of care, but the doctor excludes them from the development the care plan that can create a weakness in the plan and the implementation. Similarly if a teacher that has full knowledge of the subject [certified] but does not engage the student's interest in the subject, then what is the likelihood of the student making the extra effort needed to learn the subject?
If certification is the only means use to validate a teacher/professional whose effectiveness is significantly controlled by the person being served then we should not be surprised by the disappointments we are experiencing or we should develop was to measure beyond certification such as interpersonal skills.

Bones
Thu, 10/10/2019 - 1:44pm

Accepting that this comment is a complete deflection away from the issue at hand, it's clearly an issue to have people who aren't trained in education trying to teach, just as its an issue for these substitutes being exploited and paid less to do the job.

duane
Sat, 10/12/2019 - 3:42pm

Bones,
You seem to hear only want you are listening for. The point, if all you offer is teacher certification to justify more money you are failing to consider that we will continue to be disappointed with the results. You are ignoring that certification only measures part of what it takes to be a successful teacher [interpersonal relationship with the student], you are ignoring that our culture has change and the learning process needs to change, you are ignoring that as the culture the educational process needs to change. "Our schools still follow the same [Tayloristic] rigid march through time as they did a century ago, fixed class durations, and fixed semesters, proceeding through the same unyielding sequence of "core" courses, all of which ensure every (normal) student graduates from high school at the same age with, presumably the same set of knowledge." Todd Rose writes in his "The End of Average." The reference to 'Tayloristic' is from Fredrick Winslow Taylor the author of the 'The Principles of Scientific Management' which was applied to education by John Franklin Bobbit in his 1912 "The Elimination of Waste in Education'. [see 'Late Bloomers' by Rich Karlgaard 2019 starting with page 58]
You want it to be about the teachers, but is it about how society has changed in the last 100 years but education and how they want to spend more money have in effect not changed in that 100 years.