Benton Harbor schools may be open for now, but test scores are the pits

Benton Harbor schools have a long way to go to turn around dismal test scores. (Bridge file photo)

Struggling financially and academically, Benton Harbor schools got a fresh dose of bad news Thursday, with the release of state test scores showing their students are learning at among the lowest levels in the state.

Less than one in 16 third-graders in Benton Harbor are proficient in reading or math, according to proficiency rates for the 2018-19 school year released by the Michigan Department of Education. That proficiency rate of about 6 percent (a year earlier it was below 5 percent) is less than one-seventh the state average.

Proficiency rates in Benton Harbor are even worse in other test subject areas in grades 4-8 and 11, where less than 5 percent of students were proficient.

Benton Harbor is a low-income school district, and test scores are stubbornly tied to poverty. But even among school districts that serve poor communities, Benton Harbor stands out. Among high-poverty school districts with at least 1,750 students, Benton Harbor has the lowest test scores in the state.

In Detroit, test scores rose –  often significantly so – nearly across the board, with gains in 11 of 12 tests. The percentage of third-graders proficient in math rose by a third, for example, to 16 percent.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer proposed closing Benton Harbor High School because of low academic performance and a district debt that had reached $18 million. Her proposal led to a backlash in Benton Harbor, as the community rallied around the city’s sole high school.

On Aug. 16, the state officials reached a compromise with the school district: take part in a committee of state and local leaders to consider ways to save the school, pay down debt and improve academics.

Like what you’re reading in Bridge? Please consider a donation to support our work!

We are a nonprofit Michigan news site focused on issues that impact all citizens. In an era of click bait and biased news, we focus on taking the time to learn both sides of a story before we post it. Bridge stories are always free, but our work costs money. If our journalism helps you understand and love Michigan more, please consider supporting our work. It takes just a moment to donate here.

Pay with VISA Pay with MasterCard Pay with American Express Donate now

Comment Form

Add new comment

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.

Comments

Kevin Grand
Thu, 08/29/2019 - 12:25pm

And no one is doing the obvious thing (like shutting down this failed district like the state has done previously with four others)...why?

Jennifer
Sat, 08/31/2019 - 9:06am

The problem with closing Benton Harbor H.S. is those undereducated students would be shuffled to another school district and made someone else's "problem." If the tax payers in Benton Harbor are willing to pay for their inefficient school...let them. The state should give the school an ultimatum. Bring your academics up to par or no state funding. They will sink or swim.

Dale Westrick
Sun, 09/01/2019 - 4:15pm

Graduated but not educated:
I graduated from high school in 1960. At that time jobs were plentiful and I was able to make a living just with my natural ability. The world has changed a lot since then and I would struggle to get a good paying job if I graduated in 2019. My personal feeling is that we all need to help each other be the best citizen we can be. If you are able mentor a young person or anyone that requested it is very important and can improve their chances of being a productive citizen.
Please the next time you have a chance to provide support instead of making a smart remark just do it.
Quote:
My 4 year grandson is always asking why. Once we asked him why he is always asking why. His answer was because I don’t know them things.
Failure is not an option our countries future depends on it.
Dale Westrick