Land O Links

"By three methods we may learn wisdom: First, by reflection, which is noblest; Second, by imitation, which is easiest; and third by experience, which is the bitterest" -- Confucius.

* From a new AARP report: "According to Genworth, the median daily rate in Michigan for a nursing home in 2011 was $235 for a private room (median annual rate of $85,775) and $220 for a semi-private room (median annual rate of $80,300). The median annual cost for a private one-bedroom unit in an assisted living setting was $36,000, or $3,000 per month. The median annual cost of receiving 30 hours a week of home care in Michigan in 2011 was $29,453." (emphasis added)

Almost 63 percent of Michigan nursing home residents rely on Medicaid to pay for their care. The AARP wants Michigan to change its Medicaid policies to allow more seniors to receive stay-at-home care:

http://bridgemi.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/AARPMI.LTSS_.whitepaper20121.pdf

* Even as our population ages, the number of nursing homes has been trending downward in the last decade. And nursing home occupancy rates have dipped a bit, too.

https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Provider-Enrollment-and-Certification/CertificationandComplianc/downloads//nursinghomedatacompendium_508.pdf

* Is it something in the water? A new map of county population estimates shows that between April 2010 and April 2011, 14 of the 16 counties that border Lake Huron lost population. In many of the counties, the population drop exceeded 1 percent. The Lake Michigan coast didn't fare much better. Of the 18 counties on Lake Michigan, 11 counties suffered a population drop:

http://www.michigan.gov/documents/cgi/cgi_census_ctychangemap_1011_381627_7.pdf

* Michigan Radio takes a look at the prospects for Generation Y (translation: young folks) and finds a young couple who have decided to make a go of it in Michigan, despite the fact that the jobless rate for ages 20 to 24 is 15.3 percent (perhaps it should be Generation Yikes!):

http://www.michiganradio.org/post/happy-home-generation-y-looks-success-its-own-terms

* Bookmark tip: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/. The Atlantic does an outstanding job on the Web, particularly with its bloggers. This part of the Atlantic empire focuses on urban issues -- a matter of concern to every Michiganian. Trust me, you don't have to live in or near a city to have your fate tied to the health, or illness, of Michigan's urban areas.

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Comments

John Q. Public
Tue, 04/10/2012 - 9:49pm
Watch Mason and Oceana Counties be the next to lose population, in the same manner as Gratiot. It isn't anything in the water--it's something on the land.