11 lessons learned from Michigan’s top high schools

Bridge asked the leaders of high schools ranked No. 1-11 in the 2014 Academic State Champs to share lessons they’ve learned about raising student achievement. Like all top educators, they were happy to offer success strategies. From their answers, we picked one nugget of wisdom from each school. We begin with #11, Bloomingdale...
(click the link below the picture to view the next secret of success)

A policy or strategy that has helped move the needle on student achievement?

NEXT: #10 - Kingsley Area High School, Kingsley (Grand Traverse County)

 

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Comments

George
Wed, 02/11/2015 - 11:25am
Where is the listing for ALL schools in Michigan?
John Q. Public
Wed, 02/11/2015 - 11:37pm
Is "Speaking in Cliches" a required class in graduate schools of education? These principals and superintendents probably think the trite phrases they spout are unique ideas worthy of praise. Is an award that is based on a philosophy that the children of monetarily poor parents are expected to be academically poor performers an award worth celebrating?