Nine candidates file to run for Michigan’s governor

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August 2018 update: Gretchen Whitmer wins Democratic primary for Michigan governor
August 2018 update: Bill Schuette wins Republican nod for Michigan governor

The big guns competing for the Democratic and Republican nominations for governor have officially filed for the coming election battle.

One anticipated Democratic candidate will not appear on August’s primary ballot, however. And Libertarians will face their first primary challenge in state history.

Tuesday was the state’s filing deadline for candidates for governor, U.S. Senate, Congress, state House and Senate, and judges.The Republican ticket includes all four GOP candidates who have been actively campaigning this spring – Attorney General Bill Schuette, Lt. Gov. Brian Calley, state Sen. Patrick Colbeck and Saginaw physician Jim Hines.

Three other Republicans – Joseph Thomas DeRose, Earl Lackie and Evan Space – who formed committees to run for governor, did not submit signatures to appear on the August primary ballot. (Candidates for governor must collect at least 15,000 valid signatures from registered Michigan voters.)

On the Democratic ticket, former state Senate Minority Leader Gretchen Whitmer; Abdul El-Sayed, Detroit’s former health director; and Ann Arbor businessman Shri Thanedar all filed petitions to run.

Related: 2018 Michigan Election Voter & Candidate Toolbox

Former Xerox executive Bill Cobbs, who had appeared at Democratic debates throughout the winter and spring, did not file to appear on the August primary ballot. He told the Detroit Free Press on Tuesday that he planned to run as a write-in candidate because of potential problems with his signatures.

For the first time in state history, the Libertarian Party will have a primary challenge, between Bill Gelineau, a businessman, and John Tatar, a military veteran and former teacher, according to Secretary of State records and candidate websites. Previously, the party has nominated its candidate for governor at a party convention, Secretary of State spokesman Fred Woodhams said.

What happens now: State elections staff will review the petitions to ensure candidates submitted enough valid signatures.

Candidates running as independents have until July 19 to file at least 30,000 valid signatures with the state, while candidates from other parties are nominated at their respective parties’ conventions this summer. Write-in candidates seeking to run as Republicans, Democrats or Libertarians have until July 27 to declare their intent with the state.

Top Michigan Truth Squad stories on Michigan governor candidates:

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Comments

Victoria
Wed, 04/25/2018 - 7:30pm

I am all in with
ABDUL FOR MICHIGAN!
He is the most progressive candidate that will best represent the citizens of Michigan.

Matt
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 10:31am

Too bad he and Shri Thanedar are just designed to split the Bernie voters and make the Gretch look moderate in comparison. I appreciate it when honest Marxists run for office.