Once at rock bottom, this Northern Michigan elementary now produces stars

Kenwood Elementary in Cadillac is proving that low-income students can learn to read as well as their wealthier classmates. Can the rest of Michigan learn the same lesson? (Bridge photo by Ron French)

CADILLAC – By almost any indicator, the students at Kenwood Elementary in Cadillac should be poor readers.

Almost three in four Kenwood students are economically disadvantaged, in a state that ranks 44th in the nation in low-income fourth-grade reading skills.

More than nine in 10 students at the school are white; Michigan’s poor, white students rank a dismal 49th in fourth-grade reading, ahead of only Alaska.

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Yet Kenwood’s low-income students are reading all-stars, meeting Michigan’s fourth-grade reading standards at double the rate of poor students elsewhere in the state. That’s quite a record for a school that, just four years ago, was one of the worst-performing in Michigan as measured by the Michigan Department of Education.

That turnaround was no miracle, say school leaders in Cadillac, just a new approach to teaching, a focus on data, and a lot of work.

“Change is hard,” said Cadillac Superintendent Jennifer Brown. “A sense of urgency is needed.”

Four years ago, Kenwood Elementary was in the second percentile of schools in Michigan; two years later, it had rocketed to the 59th percentile. (Bridge photo by Ron French)

The question is whether Michigan can find that same sense of urgency to respond to poor education performance across the state.

Scores released this month from the National Assessment for Educational Progress, often called the “nation’s report card,” showed Michigan remains in the bottom third nationally in overall student achievement. Michigan fourth-graders ranked 36th in reading compared to their peers in other states.

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That should be sobering to state leaders, because early literacy is considered a major indicator of later academic success.

More sobering is an analysis conducted by Brian Jacob, a University of Michigan economics professor. Even when economic and social indicators (such as poverty) are taken into account, Michigan schools underperform compared with most other states.  

Michigan also had the biggest decrease in fourth-grade reading and eighth-grade math scores between 2003 and 2015 among all students.

“Michigan is doing worse,” Jacob said. “I don’t think anyone knows exactly what the reason is, and that’s partly because there are lots of reasons.”

Michigan’s poor performance doesn’t surprise University of Michigan early literacy researcher Nell Duke. “States vary in the degree to which their policies and practices support the education of students, including low-income students,” Duke said.

“For example, Michigan funds our schools less equitably than many other states, which affects low-income students of all races,” Duke said.  Many high-performing states give added money to poor districts because it costs more in additional staffing and resources to raise student achievement among low-income students. In Michigan, per-pupil funding is equal for students regardless of income.

Michigan also invests less in teacher continuing education than other states, Duke said.

“Our students just really don’t have the support, and in some cases our schools don’t have the staffing that some other (states) do,” said Ron Koehler, assistant superintendent of Kent Intermediate School District, which includes Grand Rapids Public Schools. “We’re last in the nation in terms of school nurses, for example. We don’t have as many social workers to deal with issues (as other states).”

Comparing the Great Lakes State with the Sunshine State offers an example of how the nitty-gritty of state policy can affect learning. While Michigan’s low-income white fourth-graders rank 49th in reading, Florida’s rank second, with reading skills almost two years ahead of similar students in Michigan. A decade ago, Florida’s fourth-graders were a year behind Michigan’s.

Smartest kids: In Florida, early reading and frequent testing bring results, and pushback

One element in that turnaround: Florida invested heavily in early literacy, in additional staffing and teacher training, to the tune of $130 million in 2014 alone. By comparison, Michigan allocated $6 million for early literacy coaches in 2017.

Florida voters passed a constitutional amendment in 2010 capping class size at 18 for kindergarten through third grade and 22 for fourth through eighth grades. Florida also has universal pre-K available to all families. Michigan’s pre-K program is available only to low- and moderate-income families, and even among those families an estimated 30,000 4-year-olds still do not have access to high-quality early education.  

In a 2014 interview with Bridge, Florida’s Foundation for Excellence In Education CEO Patricia Levesque said, “If a big state with a Michigan-size population of low-income students can improve, maybe there are some things Michigan can learn from Florida’s experience that would be useful.”

There may also be lessons closer to home, too, in a blue-collar town in northern Michigan.

Hope in an unexpected place

Cadillac is a town of 10,000 in the northwest Lower Peninsula. In the 1800s, it was known for its lumber business and locomotive manufacturing. Rock band KISS played at a homecoming dance there in 1975. Today, it’s a typical northern Michigan community, with below-average household income and educational attainment, surviving on small industries and tourism.

“I know people want to find a silver bullet in a program, but most of that turnaround was due to a shift in thinking. It really is about finding people who are committed to the work and the kids, and are willing to roll up their sleeves (and say) ‘Whatever the kids bring to school, we’re going to work with it.’” ‒ Cadillac Superintendent Jennifer Brown

Four years ago, the Michigan Department of Education placed Cadillac’s highest-poverty school – Kenwood Elementary – in the second percentile of all Michigan schools, based on assessments and performance growth on a variety of tests and subjects.

Two years later, the school rose to the 59th percentile.

The remarkable turnaround was based partly on the school’s rising reading scores. On the 2017 M-STEP, Michigan’s state accountability test, only 29 percent of the state’s low-income fourth-graders were proficient or better in English language arts, half the rate of their wealthier classmates.

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But at high-poverty Kenwood, 62 percent of low-income fourth-graders were proficient or higher ‒ one of the highest rates for low-income students in the state.

Kenwood’s success shows that Michigan schools can improve learning, and can do it without a huge infusion of cash.

An emphasis on small group learning and data have helped turn around a struggling, low-income elementary school. (Bridge photo by Ron French)

In a small, cluttered principal’s office, Kenwood Principal Kelly Buckmaster and Cadillac Superintendent Jennifer Brown rattled off a list of changes instituted at the school since its low-water mark in 2014.

  • Major teacher shakeup: Six of Kenwood’s 14 classroom teachers were replaced. “We gave them the option – get on board (with the plan) or (leave),” Brown said.
  • Support staff: The school added two certified teachers without classroom assignments – a behavioral specialist to head off student issues before they caused disruptions, and an instructional coach who meets with every teacher at least once a month to go over data and tweak teaching methods sort of like a batting coach on a baseball team. The Cadillac Area Public Schools district squeezed money from other programs to fill the new positions.
  • Common planning time: Teachers have time during the school week to meet to strategize classwork.
  • Food and dentists: Kenwood offers free breakfast for all students, rather than the third of students who received it before the turnaround. And a dentist visits the school twice a year for students who may not see dentists regularly.
  • Quick turnaround classroom data: “My teachers have weekly common planning time,” Buckmaster said. “One week we may be looking at math data, and another week at reading data: ‘Here’s where we want to be. Here’s the kids who got there. Here’s the kids who didn’t get there. What are we going to do to get them there? How are we going to assess that they actually got there?’”
  • Smaller groups: An emphasis on small-group and individualized instruction, to work with students who are struggling with a concept. This was more complicated than it sounds, Buckmaster said. Teachers had to prepare multiple lessons that could keep various groups active at the same time.
  • Good vibes: A culture that praises students for what they do right rather than criticizing them for what they do wrong. “When you walk into the school, you can feel the positive environment,” said third-grade teacher Kelly Baas.

“It probably doesn’t sound revolutionary,” admitted Brown. “I know people want to find a silver bullet in a program, but most of that turnaround was due to a shift in thinking. It really is about finding people who are committed to the work and the kids, and are willing to roll up their sleeves (and say) ‘Whatever the kids bring to school, we’re going to work with it.’”

“We still have all the problems,” Buckmaster said. “We just handle them differently now. We focus on what we can control.”

The reforms at Kenwood have been so successful they’ve been expanded to other elementary schools in Cadillac, with Brown squeezing dollars from the district’s budget to pay for more literacy coaches.

What happened at Kenwood can happen elsewhere, Brown said. “We can’t clone Kelly and her staff, but you don’t need to,” she said. “Teachers work hard. They’re invested. No one gets into the profession to see kids not succeed. This is scalable, if teachers are supported in the right way.”

That support includes building in time for teachers to work together to share an idea, ensuring they receive quick access to student data, and providing the money for good professional development.

“It takes a commitment to allocate resources where needs are and not just follow the same paradigm you’ve always followed,” Brown said.

The question is whether the state now has that same sense of urgency that Kenwood instructional coach Heidi Stange feels when she recalls the faces of teachers the day they learned the school was in the second percentile.

“We can’t think we have a handle on it, because then we’re losing focus,” Stange said. “It scares me when I think about us sliding.”

Different income, different reading skills

There is a frustratingly stubborn gap in the reading skills of Michigan students from low-income families and their wealthier classmates. Look up the percentage of poor students and non-poor students who were proficient or higher on the M-STEP third-grade English language arts test in 2017 by typing in the name of your school district.

District Poor students Non-poor students
Tested Passed Percent Tested Passed Percent
Zeeland 117 58 49.6 289 208 72
Ypsilanti 213 24 11.3 21 <10 *
Yale 55 30 54.5 76 54 71.1
Wyoming 250 63 25.2 50 23 46
Wyandotte 150 57 38 117 65 55.6
Woodland School 2 < 10 * 21 10 47.6
Woodland Park Academy 38 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Woodhaven-Brownstown 175 67 38.3 201 138 68.7
Wolverine 18 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Windemere Park Charter Academy 51 22 43.1 30 17 56.7
Winans Academy 58 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Williamston 23 11 47.8 89 72 80.9
William C. Abney Academy 52 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Will Carleton Charter School Academy 2 < 10 * 24 16 66.7
Whittemore-Prescott 47 19 40.4 7 < 10 *
Whitmore Lake 30 11 36.7 27 16 59.3
Whitehall 75 30 40 76 53 69.7
Whiteford 9 < 10 * 39 21 53.8
Whitefish 1 < 10 * 0   0
White Pine Academy 4 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
White Pigeon 41 < 10 * 25 10 40
White Cloud 41 18 43.9 17 < 10 *
Westwood Heights 41 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Westwood 131 10 7.6 10 < 10 *
Weston 24 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Western 90 35 38.9 131 87 66.4
West Village Academy 42 13 31 11 < 10 *
West Ottawa 269 138 51.3 182 133 73.1
West MI Academy of Environmental Science 49 20 40.8 23 17 73.9
West MI Academy of Arts and Academics 20 < 10 * 41 22 53.7
West Iron 43 13 30.2 21 < 10 *
West Branch-Rose City 94 42 44.7 43 30 69.8
West Bloomfield 90 26 28.9 241 153 63.5
Wells Township 1 < 10 * 0   0
Webberville 28 20 71.4 25 18 72
Wayne-Westland 578 94 16.3 265 120 45.3
Wayland Union 104 44 42.3 130 81 62.3
Waverly 149 72 48.3 54 32 59.3
Watervliet 55 21 38.2 35 16 45.7
Watersmeet 13 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Waterford Montessori Academy 5 < 10 * 27 16 59.3
Waterford 354 131 37 243 135 55.6
Washington-Parks Academy 153 31 20.3 35 < 10 *
Warrendale Charter Academy 81 20 24.7 2 < 10 *
Warren Woods 102 26 25.5 88 40 45.5
Warren Consolidated 626 188 30 405 212 52.3
Walton Charter Academy 79 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Walled Lake 242 60 24.8 746 425 57
Walkerville 17 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Walker Charter Academy 27 < 10 * 47 37 78.7
Waldron 9 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
Walden Green Montessori 7 < 10 * 11 < 10 *
Wakefield-Marenisco 4 < 10 * 12 < 10 *
Voyageur Academy 65 10 15.4 4 < 10 *
Vista Charter Academy 64 18 28.1 7 < 10 *
Vicksburg 63 33 52.4 100 69 69
Vestaburg 24 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Vassar 43 11 25.6 15 10 66.7
Vanguard Charter Academy 34 11 32.4 51 31 60.8
Vandercook Lake 75 23 30.7 31 14 45.2
Vanderbilt Charter Academy 36 21 58.3 11 < 10 *
Vanderbilt 2 < 10 * 0   0
Van Dyke 147 26 17.7 56 16 28.6
Van Buren 180 25 13.9 112 46 41.1
Utica 625 228 36.5 1,250 787 63
University Yes Academy 44 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
University Preparatory Science and Math (PSAD) 57 20 35.1 29 12 41.4
University Preparatory Academy (PSAD) 118 33 28 21 < 10 *
Universal Learning Academy 50 15 30 14 < 10 *
Universal Academy 51 < 10 * 0   0
Unionville-Sebewaing 25 11 44 21 12 57.1
Union City 33 < 10 * 25 11 44
Ubly 20 < 10 * 16 11 68.8
Troy 123 55 44.7 802 588 73.3
Triumph Academy 46 22 47.8 36 19 52.8
Trillium Academy 35 14 40 20 14 70
Tri County 102 30 29.4 51 27 52.9
Trenton 41 < 10 * 134 64 47.8
Traverse City 293 105 35.8 427 255 59.7
Tipton Academy 53 18 34 12 < 10 *
Timbuktu Academy 39 < 10 * 0   0
Timberland Academy 66 10 15.2 5 < 10 *
Three Rivers 131 54 41.2 81 57 70.4
Three Oaks Public School Academy 65 11 16.9 2 < 10 *
Three Lakes Academy 7 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Thornapple Kellogg 84 34 40.5 136 90 66.2
The Paris Academy 4 < 10 * 8 < 10 *
The New Standard Academy 49 20 40.8 5 < 10 *
The James and Grace Lee Boggs School 7 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
The Dearborn Academy 44 18 40.9 1 < 10 *
Tekonsha 13 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Tecumseh 72 34 47.2 152 97 63.8
Taylor International Academy 11 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Taylor Exemplar Academy 55 18 32.7 27 17 63
Taylor 413 83 20.1 117 43 36.8
Tawas 48 22 45.8 36 23 63.9
Tahquamenon 32 15 46.9 21 11 52.4
Swartz Creek 128 51 39.8 120 61 50.8
Swan Valley 52 26 50 78 53 67.9
Suttons Bay 24 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
Superior Central 26 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Summit Academy North 87 30 34.5 40 15 37.5
Summit Academy 24 < 10 * 19 < 10 *
Summerfield 15 < 10 * 40 27 67.5
Success Mile Academy 42 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Sturgis 226 77 34.1 20 < 10 *
Stockbridge 38 18 47.4 54 36 66.7
Stephenson 17 < 10 * 16 10 62.5
State Street Academy 15 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
Starr Detroit Academy 97 16 16.5 7 < 10 *
Star International Academy 109 40 36.7 12 < 10 *
Stanton Township 11 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Standish-Sterling 56 26 46.4 46 32 69.6
St. Louis 51 < 10 * 27 14 51.9
St. Joseph 59 21 35.6 133 87 65.4
St. Johns 70 25 35.7 116 75 64.7
St. Ignace 10 < 10 * 15 < 10 *
St. Charles 24 < 10 * 25 18 72
Springport 49 20 40.8 21 < 10 *
Spring Lake 28 23 82.1 146 124 84.9
Sparta 79 44 55.7 90 62 68.9
Southwest Detroit Community School 59 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Southgate 121 31 25.6 115 59 51.3
Southfield 272 83 30.5 155 68 43.9
South Redford 164 44 26.8 75 29 38.7
South Pointe Scholars Charter Academy 32 11 34.4 53 32 60.4
South Lyon 100 30 30 495 320 64.6
South Lake 89 27 30.3 35 20 57.1
South Haven 76 24 31.6 61 35 57.4
South Canton Scholars Charter Academy 17 < 10 * 70 46 65.7
South Arbor Charter Academy 17 < 10 * 67 40 59.7
Sodus Twp #5 5 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Sigel Twp. #4F 3 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Shepherd 64 20 31.3 73 35 47.9
Shelby 80 17 21.3 12 < 10 *
Schoolcraft 25 11 44 49 29 59.2
Sault Ste. Marie 70 34 48.6 45 33 73.3
Saugatuck 21 10 47.6 31 30 96.8
Saranac 46 15 32.6 42 25 59.5
Sarah J. Webber Media Arts Academy 21 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Sandusky 41 19 46.3 33 20 60.6
Sand Creek 29 13 44.8 30 18 60
Saline 34 10 29.4 316 221 69.9
Saginaw Township 150 39 26 170 104 61.2
Saginaw Preparatory Academy 35 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Saginaw 412 84 20.4 83 42 50.6
Rutherford Winans Academy 39 < 10 * 0   0
Rudyard 37 < 10 * 15 < 10 *
Royal Oak 71 25 35.2 320 208 65
Ross-Hill Academy 12 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Roseville 209 48 23 153 33 21.6
Roscommon 41 13 31.7 27 12 44.4
Romulus 144 43 29.9 51 16 31.4
Romeo 87 33 37.9 279 165 59.1
Rogers City 19 13 68.4 14 < 10 *
Rockford 81 30 37 457 283 61.9
Rochester 93 42 45.2 947 683 72.1
Riverview 83 33 39.8 117 64 54.7
Riverside Academy 73 17 23.3 0   0
River Valley 17 < 10 * 19 13 68.4
River Rouge 96 15 15.6 35 13 37.1
River City Scholars Charter Academy 55 11 20 4 < 10 *
Ridge Park Charter Academy 58 19 32.8 17 12 70.6
Richmond 34 16 47.1 58 35 60.3
Richfield Public School Academy 75 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Republic-Michigamme 3 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Renaissance Public School Academy 27 < 10 * 20 15 75
Regents Academy 1 < 10 * 0   0
Regent Park Scholars Charter Academy 81 10 12.3 1 < 10 *
Reeths-Puffer 151 55 36.4 132 73 55.3
Reese 32 19 59.4 18 < 10 *
Reed City 81 18 22.2 47 20 42.6
Redford Union 114 26 22.8 25 < 10 *
Reading 32 < 10 * 18 < 10 *
Reach Charter Academy 60 13 21.7 15 < 10 *
Ravenna 31 12 38.7 32 19 59.4
Rapid River 5 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Quincy 41 20 48.8 36 21 58.3
Quest Charter Academy 57 23 40.4 27 14 51.9
Prevail Academy 56 11 19.6 13 < 10 *
Powell 2 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Potterville 25 12 48 38 23 60.5
Posen 13 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
Portland 46 23 50 111 77 69.4
Portage 150 61 40.7 456 330 72.4
Port Huron 380 105 27.6 225 121 53.8
Pontiac Academy for Excellence 51 < 10 * 18 < 10 *
Pontiac 221 31 14 58 < 10 *
Plymouth-Canton 175 66 37.7 908 599 66
Plymouth Scholars Charter Academy 8 < 10 * 81 56 69.1
Plymouth Educational Center Charter School 34 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Plainwell 71 23 32.4 128 89 69.5
Pittsford 27 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Pine River 49 16 32.7 26 15 57.7
Pinconning 59 19 32.2 38 23 60.5
Pinckney 26 < 10 * 122 60 49.2
Pickford 11 < 10 * 16 < 10 *
Pewamo-Westphalia 10 < 10 * 11 < 10 *
Petoskey 71 24 33.8 108 69 63.9
Perry 39 12 30.8 39 25 64.1
Pentwater 7 < 10 * 13 11 84.6
Pennfield 75 22 29.3 72 40 55.6
Pellston 21 < 10 * 11 < 10 *
Peck 16 < 10 * 8 < 10 *
Paw Paw 65 22 33.8 83 55 66.3
Parchment 54 18 33.3 45 27 60
Paramount Charter Academy 34 < 10 * 17 < 10 *
Paragon Academy 55 20 36.4 30 17 56.7
Pansophia Academy 28 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Oxford 62 19 30.6 232 128 55.2
Owosso 136 37 27.2 90 43 47.8
Owendale-Gagetown 10 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Ovid-Elsie 59 25 42.4 36 24 66.7
Otsego 67 43 64.2 113 83 73.5
Oscoda 65 17 26.2 17 10 58.8
Orchard View 112 38 33.9 38 17 44.7
Ontonagon 6 < 10 * 9 < 10 *
Onsted 44 19 43.2 52 34 65.4
Onekama 19 < 10 * 15 < 10 *
Onaway 34 10 29.4 19 < 10 *
Olivet 29 < 10 * 57 42 73.7
Old Redford Academy 117 40 34.2 21 < 10 *
Okemos 44 17 38.6 245 181 73.9
Ojibway Charter School 7 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Oakside Scholars Charter Academy 68 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Oakridge 104 36 34.6 49 29 59.2
Oakland International 44 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Oakland Academy 13 < 10 * 13 11 84.6
Oak Park 212 44 20.8 27 < 10 *
Novi 24 10 41.7 474 323 68.1
Nottawa 6 < 10 * 11 < 10 *
Norway-Vulcan 26 < 10 * 23 12 52.2
Northwest 121 50 41.3 102 55 53.9
Northville 24 11 45.8 519 370 71.3
Northview 108 45 41.7 116 63 54.3
Northridge Academy 33 < 10 * 0   0
Northport 7 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
North Star Academy 13 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
North Saginaw Charter Academy 55 11 20 3 < 10 *
North Muskegon 25 15 60 50 34 68
North Huron 16 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
North Dickinson 7 < 10 * 13 < 10 *
North Central 11 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
North Branch 87 41 47.1 81 48 59.3
North Adams-Jerome 18 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Noor International Academy 12 < 10 * 13 12 92.3
Niles 155 50 32.3 106 50 47.2
NICE 29 15 51.7 68 43 63.2
Newaygo 79 14 17.7 48 19 39.6
New Paradigm Glazer-Loving Academy 39 < 10 * 0   0
New Paradigm College Prep 12 < 10 * 0   0
New Lothrop 16 < 10 * 35 21 60
New Haven 52 12 23.1 53 16 30.2
New Buffalo 24 11 45.8 21 13 61.9
New Branches Charter Academy 18 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
New Beginnings Academy 21 < 10 * 0   0
New Bedford Academy 7 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Negaunee 41 18 43.9 83 44 53
Napoleon 50 27 54 45 34 75.6
Nah Tah Wahsh Public School Academy 15 < 10 * 0   0
Muskegon Montessori Academy for Environmental Change 13 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Muskegon Heights Public School Academy System 52 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Muskegon 224 30 13.4 27 < 10 *
Munising 25 < 10 * 23 < 10 *
Multicultural Academy 9 < 10 * 0   0
Mt. Pleasant 96 37 38.5 138 77 55.8
Mt. Morris 125 20 16 12 < 10 *
Mt. Clemens Montessori Academy 7 < 10 * 43 25 58.1
Mount Clemens 57 11 19.3 21 < 10 *
Morrice 15 < 10 * 9 < 10 *
Morley Stanwood 67 < 10 * 23 < 10 *
Morey Montessori Public School Academy 6 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Morenci 24 < 10 * 16 < 10 *
Moran Twp 3 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Montrose 61 20 32.8 38 22 57.9
Montague 59 16 27.1 55 38 69.1
Montabella 41 < 10 * 18 < 10 *
Monroe 265 69 26 97 52 53.6
Mona Shores 112 28 25 168 100 59.5
Momentum Academy 10 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Mio-AuSable 22 10 45.5 12 < 10 *
Millington 49 14 28.6 32 17 53.1
Mildred C. Wells Preparatory Academy 23 < 10 * 0   0
Milan 48 13 27.1 83 39 47
Mid-Michigan Leadership Academy 38 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Midland Academy of Advanced and Creative Studies 5 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
Midland 202 82 40.6 314 223 71
Mid Peninsula 12 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Michigan Virtual Charter Academy 93 29 31.2 31 17 54.8
Michigan Technical Academy 88 25 28.4 19 < 10 *
Michigan School for the Deaf 3 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Michigan School for the Arts 32 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Michigan Mathematics and Science Academy 44 < 10 * 0   0
Michigan Great Lakes Virtual Academy 84 12 14.3 18 11 61.1
Michigan Educational Choice Center 80 10 12.5 15 < 10 *
Michigan Connections Academy 46 17 37 41 26 63.4
Michigan Center 49 17 34.7 46 20 43.5
Metro Charter Academy 61 29 47.5 24 13 54.2
Mesick 32 10 31.3 12 < 10 *
Merritt Academy 15 < 10 * 27 13 48.1
Merrill 15 < 10 * 8 < 10 *
Meridian 48 13 27.1 29 10 34.5
Menominee 57 24 42.1 47 22 46.8
Mendon 24 10 41.7 18 < 10 *
Memphis 19 < 10 * 40 18 45
Melvindale-N. Allen Park 162 47 29 29 16 55.2
McBain 47 21 44.7 33 19 57.6
Mayville 27 12 44.4 20 < 10 *
Mattawan 51 14 27.5 202 147 72.8
Mason Co. Eastern 25 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
Mason Co. Central 60 20 33.3 32 15 46.9
Mason (Monroe) 44 21 47.7 33 29 87.9
Mason (Ingham) 57 20 35.1 147 91 61.9
Marysville 64 34 53.1 149 98 65.8
Martin Luther King, Jr. Education Center Academy 31 23 74.2 2 < 10 *
Martin 30 20 66.7 10 < 10 *
Marshall Academy 15 < 10 * 16 < 10 *
Marshall 109 38 34.9 106 63 59.4
Marquette 53 19 35.8 164 90 54.9
Marlette 45 16 35.6 12 < 10 *
Marion 21 < 10 * 11 < 10 *
Marcellus 23 10 43.5 13 10 76.9
Mar Lee 20 10 50 9 < 10 *
Maple Valley 57 15 26.3 29 < 10 *
Manton 39 < 10 * 32 19 59.4
Manistique 36 < 10 * 15 < 10 *
Manistee 66 17 25.8 42 23 54.8
Manchester 13 < 10 * 40 17 42.5
Mancelona 53 < 10 * 15 < 10 *
Madison-Carver Academy 69 14 20.3 13 < 10 *
Madison Academy 19 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Madison (Oakland) 56 21 37.5 5 < 10 *
Madison (Lenawee) 78 37 47.4 52 28 53.8
Macomb Montessori Academy 12 < 10 * 0   0
Mackinaw City 8 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
MacDowell Preparatory Academy 29 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Ludington 83 24 28.9 70 45 64.3
Lowell 107 52 48.6 163 106 65
Livonia 283 92 32.5 729 437 59.9
Livingston Classical Cyber Academy 3 < 10 * 15 11 73.3
Litchfield 5 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Linden Charter Academy 75 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Linden 59 21 35.6 118 81 68.6
Lincoln Park 329 86 26.1 56 24 42.9
Lincoln 139 16 11.5 109 48 44
Lighthouse Academy 4 < 10 * 0   0
Light of the World Academy 1 < 10 * 17 < 10 *
Leslie 45 26 57.8 36 25 69.4
Les Cheneaux 9 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
Leland 12 < 10 * 19 11 57.9
Legacy Charter Academy 86 14 16.3 2 < 10 *
Leelanau Montessori Public School Academy 3 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Lawton 40 21 52.5 36 23 63.9
Lawrence 26 10 38.5 9 < 10 *
Laurus Academy 57 24 42.1 24 14 58.3
Lapeer 165 67 40.6 147 89 60.5
Lansing Charter Academy 70 11 15.7 11 < 10 *
Lansing 653 138 21.1 200 70 35
L'Anse Creuse 252 77 30.6 420 257 61.2
L'Anse 24 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
Landmark Academy 35 14 40 23 11 47.8
Lamphere 114 23 20.2 93 35 37.6
Lakewood 69 38 55.1 63 51 81
LakeVille 49 18 36.7 31 16 51.6
Lakeview (Montcalm) 36 14 38.9 35 25 71.4
Lakeview (Macomb) 99 44 44.4 203 101 49.8
Lakeview (Calhoun) 180 38 21.1 134 73 54.5
Lakeshore (Berrien) 62 28 45.2 129 87 67.4
Lake Shore (Macomb) 77 22 28.6 130 64 49.2
Lake Orion 110 55 50 446 310 69.5
Lake Linden-Hubbell 22 11 50 18 15 83.3
Lake Fenton 36 19 52.8 112 62 55.4
Lake City 69 13 18.8 24 13 54.2
Laingsburg 18 < 10 * 53 37 69.8
Knapp Charter Academy 49 13 26.5 30 16 53.3
Kingston 25 < 10 * 17 12 70.6
Kingsley 47 26 55.3 54 42 77.8
Kingsbury Country Day School 3 < 10 * 22 < 10 *
Keystone Academy 30 16 53.3 55 38 69.1
Keys Grace Academy 39 < 10 * 0   0
Kentwood 420 185 44 179 130 72.6
Kent City 77 37 48.1 39 30 76.9
Kenowa Hills 106 41 38.7 91 62 68.1
Kelloggsville 122 32 26.2 19 13 68.4
Kearsley 160 53 33.1 57 35 61.4
Kalkaska 82 32 39 34 18 52.9
Kaleva Norman Dickson 34 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Kalamazoo 710 172 24.2 260 190 73.1
Joy Preparatory Academy 35 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Joseph K. Lumsden Bahweting Anishnabe Academy 43 20 46.5 23 13 56.5
Jonesville 56 15 26.8 43 14 32.6
Jo-Lewiston 31 16 51.6 18 < 10 *
Jenison 107 52 48.6 238 170 71.4
Jefferson International Academy 37 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Jefferson 63 33 52.4 41 24 58.5
Jackson 271 72 26.6 102 71 69.6
Ithaca 49 15 30.6 37 17 45.9
Island City Academy 5 < 10 * 19 < 10 *
Ishpeming 32 < 10 * 12 < 10 *
Ironwood 37 17 45.9 24 12 50
Iron Mountain 24 15 62.5 16 12 75
Ionia Twp #2 2 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Ionia 119 50 42 90 61 67.8
International Academy of Saginaw 17 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
International Academy Flint 76 12 15.8 10 < 10 *
Innocademy Allegan Campus 5 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Innocademy 8 < 10 * 40 24 60
Inland Lakes 23 < 10 * 17 10 58.8
Imlay City 94 33 35.1 47 23 48.9
Ida 13 < 10 * 66 48 72.7
ICademy Global 1 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Huron Valley 158 53 33.5 456 276 60.5
Huron Academy 44 11 25 33 10 30.3
Huron 65 16 24.6 128 64 50
Hudsonville 97 58 59.8 369 287 77.8
Hudson 42 14 33.3 21 11 52.4
Howell 134 56 41.8 357 223 62.5
Houghton-Portage 27 10 37 52 37 71.2
Houghton Lake 54 11 20.4 18 10 55.6
Hopkins 47 24 51.1 69 49 71
Hope of Detroit Academy 83 17 20.5 2 < 10 *
Hope Academy of West Michigan 34 < 10 * 0   0
Hope Academy 39 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Honey Creek Community School 1 < 10 * 27 22 81.5
Homer 62 18 29 27 16 59.3
Holton 54 20 37 14 < 10 *
Holt 169 55 32.5 240 140 58.3
Holly Academy 5 < 10 * 95 66 69.5
Holly 93 30 32.3 114 68 59.6
Holland 164 59 36 62 41 66.1
Hillsdale Preparatory School 5 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Hillsdale 59 25 42.4 23 13 56.5
Hillman 21 < 10 * 19 < 10 *
Highpoint Virtual Academy of Michigan 48 < 10 * 11 < 10 *
Highland Park Public School Academy System 41 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Hesperia 46 < 10 * 27 < 10 *
Henry Ford Academy: School for Creative Studies (PSAD) 55 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Hemlock 24 < 10 * 40 22 55
Hazel Park 131 18 13.7 52 11 21.2
Hastings 93 38 40.9 91 51 56
Haslett 54 29 53.7 140 109 77.9
Hartland 62 28 45.2 300 210 70
Hartford 84 11 13.1 14 < 10 *
Hart 93 15 16.1 21 11 52.4
Harrison 70 24 34.3 30 13 43.3
Harper Woods 70 17 24.3 22 < 10 *
Harper Creek 87 26 29.9 95 63 66.3
Harbor Springs 7 < 10 * 48 30 62.5
Harbor Beach 17 < 10 * 15 12 80
Hanover-Horton 31 12 38.7 55 43 78.2
Hanley International Academy 63 19 30.2 5 < 10 *
Hancock 30 15 50 28 19 67.9
Hamtramck Academy 59 27 45.8 0   0
Hamtramck 173 27 15.6 4 < 10 *
Hamilton Academy 32 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Hamilton 60 27 45 152 101 66.4
Hale 20 10 50 7 < 10 *
Hagar Twp #6 5 < 10 * 0   0
Gwinn 55 < 10 * 22 < 10 *
Gull Lake 51 18 35.3 181 112 61.9
Grosse Pointe 79 44 55.7 413 340 82.3
Grosse Ile 10 < 10 * 110 79 71.8
Greenville 149 61 40.9 150 94 62.7
Greater Heights Academy 51 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Great Oaks Academy 72 26 36.1 8 < 10 *
Great Lakes Academy 16 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Grass Lake 29 < 10 * 87 34 39.1
Grant 74 12 16.2 43 19 44.2
Grandville 103 44 42.7 226 140 61.9
Grand Traverse Academy 20 < 10 * 78 50 64.1
Grand River Academy 42 < 10 * 41 28 68.3
Grand Rapids Ellington Academy of Arts & Technology 10 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Grand Rapids Child Discovery Center 15 < 10 * 27 17 63
Grand Rapids 1,090 215 19.7 155 74 47.7
Grand Ledge 108 41 38 264 163 61.7
Grand Haven 155 82 52.9 259 194 74.9
Grand Blanc Academy 47 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Grand Blanc 204 82 40.2 362 239 66
Goodrich 30 < 10 * 102 58 56.9
Godwin Heights 133 44 33.1 14 < 10 *
Godfrey-Lee 103 27 26.2 5 < 10 *
Gobles 38 20 52.6 19 12 63.2
Global Tech Academy 24 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Global Preparatory Academy 20 < 10 * 0   0
Global Heights Academy 47 < 10 * 0   0
Glenn 4 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Glen Lake 15 < 10 * 27 14 51.9
Gladwin 78 30 38.5 49 31 63.3
Gladstone 45 22 48.9 56 40 71.4
Gibraltar 73 26 35.6 178 99 55.6
George Washington Carver 48 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
George Crockett Academy 43 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Genesee STEM Academy 37 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Genesee 34 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
GEE White Academy 44 < 10 * 0   0
GEE Edmonson Academy 25 < 10 * 0   0
Gaylord 127 53 41.7 110 62 56.4
Garden City 128 68 53.1 101 70 69.3
Galesburg-Augusta 44 14 31.8 34 15 44.1
Fulton 15 < 10 * 22 12 54.5
Fruitport 101 44 43.6 65 45 69.2
Fremont 75 29 38.7 62 33 53.2
Freeland 40 16 40 130 92 70.8
Frederick Douglass International Academy 14 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Fraser 171 64 37.4 183 103 56.3
Frankfort-Elberta 12 < 10 * 18 14 77.8
Frankenmuth 12 < 10 * 61 32 52.5
Francis Reh PSA 40 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Fowlerville 87 34 39.1 128 80 62.5
Fowler 9 < 10 * 24 20 83.3
Four Corners Montessori Academy 11 < 10 * 41 21 51.2
Fortis Academy 57 26 45.6 26 15 57.7
Forest Park 23 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
Forest Hills 82 32 39 635 438 69
Forest Area 20 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Forest Academy 23 < 10 * 12 < 10 *
Flushing 121 41 33.9 160 96 60
Flint 400 46 11.5 29 < 10 *
Flat Rock 55 21 38.2 74 48 64.9
Flat River Academy 6 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Flagship Charter Academy 72 16 22.2 2 < 10 *
Fitzgerald 157 32 20.4 21 < 10 *
Ferndale 96 11 11.5 46 21 45.7
Fenton 69 17 24.6 156 89 57.1
Fennville 71 14 19.7 17 < 10 *
Faxon Language Immersion Academy 3 < 10 * 9 < 10 *
Farwell 45 18 40 40 18 45
Farmington 138 38 27.5 514 316 61.5
Fairview 13 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Excelsior 4 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Excel Charter Academy 43 21 48.8 40 35 87.5
Ewen-Trout Creek 5 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Evergreen Academy 4 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Evart Public Schools 38 16 42.1 16 < 10 *
Essexville-Hampton 48 19 39.6 63 39 61.9
Escuela Avancemos! 46 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Escanaba 103 25 24.3 63 35 55.6
Engadine 12 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Endeavor Charter Academy 66 11 16.7 11 < 10 *
Elm River 2 < 10 * 0   0
Ellsworth 13 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Elkton-Pigeon-Bay Port Laker 31 14 45.2 31 24 77.4
Elk Rapids 32 16 50 50 30 60
El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz Academy 31 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Edwardsburg 79 36 45.6 115 98 85.2
Education Achievement System-EAS 229 11 4.8 14 < 10 *
Ecorse 54 12 22.2 6 < 10 *
Eau Claire 57 22 38.6 6 < 10 *
Eaton Rapids 93 36 38.7 69 38 55.1
Eaton Academy 22 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
Easton Twp #6 1 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
East Shore Leadership Academy 18 < 10 * 0   0
East Lansing 85 38 44.7 171 122 71.3
East Jordan 40 13 32.5 25 14 56
East Jackson 51 < 10 * 19 < 10 *
East Grand Rapids 7 < 10 * 210 178 84.8
East Detroit 135 23 17 35 < 10 *
East China 84 23 27.4 211 130 61.6
East Arbor Charter Academy 33 13 39.4 44 26 59.1
Eagle's Nest Academy 32 < 10 * 0   0
Eagle Crest Charter Academy 43 25 58.1 42 30 71.4
Durand 57 17 29.8 31 13 41.9
Dundee 42 16 38.1 59 34 57.6
Dryden 17 < 10 * 18 11 61.1
Dr. Joseph F. Pollack Academic Center of Excellence 70 19 27.1 28 12 42.9
Dowagiac Union 142 25 17.6 35 < 10 *
Dove Academy of Detroit 49 < 10 * 0   0
Dollar Bay-Tamarack City Area K-12 School 14 < 10 * 12 < 10 *
Dexter 28 13 46.4 234 137 58.5
DeWitt 42 18 42.9 183 119 65
Detroit Service Learning Academy 143 30 21 0   0
Detroit Premier Academy 71 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Detroit Merit Charter Academy 76 29 38.2 9 < 10 *
Detroit Leadership Academy 44 < 10 * 0   0
Detroit Innovation Academy 46 10 21.7 0   0
Detroit Enterprise Academy 78 15 19.2 2 < 10 *
Detroit Edison Public School Academy 106 58 54.7 10 < 10 *
Detroit Community Schools 45 16 35.6 3 < 10 *
Detroit Achievement Academy 15 < 10 * 0   0
Detroit Academy of Arts & Sciences 88 < 10 * 8 < 10 *
Detroit 2,947 273 9.3 414 59 14.3
DeTour Arts and Technology Academy 2 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Detour 6 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Delton-Kellogg 52 10 19.2 32 14 43.8
Deckerville 38 < 10 * 12 < 10 *
Decatur 42 16 38.1 18 11 61.1
Dearborn Heights #7 138 25 18.1 37 10 27
Dearborn 1,173 393 33.5 343 189 55.1
Davison 212 112 52.8 214 131 61.2
David Ellis Academy West 58 19 32.8 21 10 47.6
David Ellis Academy 33 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Dansville 14 < 10 * 27 14 51.9
Da Vinci Instittue 18 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Croswell-Lexington 73 31 42.5 69 51 73.9
Crossroads Charter Academy 24 10 41.7 11 < 10 *
Cross Creek Charter Academy 25 14 56 58 46 79.3
Crestwood 199 75 37.7 87 58 66.7
Crescent Academy 97 19 19.6 27 10 37
Creative Technologies Academy 3 < 10 * 18 < 10 *
Creative Montessori Academy 45 14 31.1 49 21 42.9
Crawford AuSable 88 34 38.6 44 32 72.7
Covert 22 < 10 * 0   0
Countryside Academy 47 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Corunna 84 27 32.1 45 24 53.3
Coopersville 86 33 38.4 114 71 62.3
Constantine 62 17 27.4 50 23 46
Conner Creek Academy East 51 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Concord Academy - Petoskey 8 < 10 * 8 < 10 *
Concord Academy - Boyne 2 < 10 * 9 < 10 *
Concord 21 < 10 * 20 11 55
Comstock Park 74 23 31.1 53 25 47.2
Comstock 90 25 27.8 26 17 65.4
Commonwealth Community Development Academy 27 < 10 * 0   0
Columbia 36 24 66.7 52 37 71.2
Colon 26 < 10 * 24 < 10 *
Coloma 66 26 39.4 33 17 51.5
Colfax Twp. 1 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Coleman 27 < 10 * 21 12 57.1
Cole Academy 15 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
Coldwater 108 26 24.1 93 53 57
Clio 131 68 51.9 98 59 60.2
Clintondale 98 13 13.3 25 < 10 *
Clinton 22 10 45.5 51 26 51
Climax-Scotts 23 < 10 * 16 < 10 *
Clawson 37 < 10 * 61 26 42.6
Clarkston 110 43 39.1 414 261 63
Clarenceville 97 22 22.7 54 23 42.6
Clare 63 21 33.3 61 33 54.1
Chippewa Valley 280 89 31.8 821 451 54.9
Chippewa Hills 98 50 51 52 32 61.5
Chesaning Union 54 25 46.3 30 23 76.7
Chelsea 21 < 10 * 151 90 59.6
Cheboygan 80 24 30 33 22 66.7
Chatfield School 15 < 10 * 39 21 53.8
Chassell Township 12 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Charyl Stockwell Academy 8 < 10 * 93 64 68.8
Charlton Heston Academy 45 15 33.3 6 < 10 *
Charlotte 95 35 36.8 81 54 66.7
Charlevoix Montessori Academy for the Arts 1 < 10 * 0   0
Charlevoix 31 < 10 * 38 23 60.5
Chandler Woods Charter Academy 19 < 10 * 65 46 70.8
Chandler Park Academy 150 33 22 8 < 10 *
Cesar Chavez Academy 157 42 26.8 5 < 10 *
Centreville 24 < 10 * 25 16 64
Central Montcalm 77 14 18.2 50 17 34
Central Lake 9 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Central Academy 38 13 34.2 9 < 10 *
Center Line 143 29 20.3 46 16 34.8
Cedar Springs 106 26 24.5 151 65 43
Cassopolis 47 14 29.8 20 12 60
Cass City 39 11 28.2 37 26 70.3
Caseville 11 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
Carsonville 13 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
Carson City-Crystal 37 10 27 18 < 10 *
Carrollton 80 13 16.3 31 < 10 *
Caro 66 20 30.3 44 20 45.5
Carney-Nadeau 13 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Carman-Ainsworth 209 72 34.4 58 30 51.7
Capac 31 < 10 * 33 12 36.4
Canton Charter Academy 11 < 10 * 70 52 74.3
Caniff Liberty Academy 32 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Camden-Frontier 22 12 54.5 16 < 10 *
Calumet 58 31 53.4 48 34 70.8
Caledonia 66 35 53 247 178 72.1
Cadillac 143 84 58.7 93 74 79.6
Byron Center Charter School 9 < 10 * 17 12 70.6
Byron Center 77 43 55.8 235 199 84.7
Byron 31 12 38.7 27 14 51.9
Burton Glen Charter Academy 77 12 15.6 4 < 10 *
Burt Township 3 < 10 * 0   0
Burr Oak 18 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Bullock Creek 56 24 42.9 64 46 71.9
Buckley 15 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
Buchanan 61 16 26.2 52 26 50
Brown City 39 17 43.6 26 19 73.1
Bronson 51 18 35.3 27 14 51.9
Britton Deerfield 23 < 10 * 12 < 10 *
Brimley 29 < 10 * 14 < 10 *
Brighton 71 40 56.3 356 258 72.5
Bridgman 26 < 10 * 38 21 55.3
Bridgeport-Spaulding 70 < 10 * 20 < 10 *
Bridge Academy 76 12 15.8 0   0
Breitung Twp 57 30 52.6 71 48 67.6
Breckenridge 27 < 10 * 22 13 59.1
Brandywine 56 13 23.2 37 17 45.9
Brandon 65 21 32.3 94 51 54.3
Branch Line School 5 < 10 * 12 < 10 *
Bradford Academy 64 < 10 * 12 < 10 *
Boyne Falls 5 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Boyne City 44 21 47.7 54 39 72.2
Bloomingdale 68 25 36.8 6 < 10 *
Bloomfield Hills 21 < 10 * 322 217 67.4
Blissfield 28 12 42.9 55 29 52.7
Black River Public School 17 < 10 * 52 26 50
Birmingham 42 11 26.2 522 343 65.7
Birch Run 77 27 35.1 57 26 45.6
Big Rapids 65 32 49.2 74 47 63.5
Big Jackson 4 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Big Bay De Noc 13 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Bessemer 21 12 57.1 29 25 86.2
Berrien Springs 85 32 37.6 35 19 54.3
Berlin Twp #3 2 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Berkley 44 15 34.1 271 158 58.3
Benzie Co. Central 67 20 29.9 47 25 53.2
Benton Harbor Charter School Academy 47 < 10 * 0   0
Benton Harbor 125 < 10 * 25 < 10 *
Bentley 46 < 10 * 15 < 10 *
Bendle 86 30 34.9 2 < 10 *
Bellevue 33 13 39.4 13 < 10 *
Bellaire 7 < 10 * 13 < 10 *
Belding 86 21 24.4 43 23 53.5
Beecher 61 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Bedford 81 31 38.3 213 146 68.5
Beaverton 47 < 10 * 15 < 10 *
Bear Lake 8 < 10 * 9 < 10 *
Beal City 19 < 10 * 28 < 10 *
Bay City Academy 27 < 10 * 12 < 10 *
Bay City 336 104 31 224 107 47.8
Battle Creek Montessori Academy 11 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Battle Creek 257 33 12.8 35 < 10 *
Bath 37 17 45.9 52 32 61.5
Bark River 31 11 35.5 15 < 10 *
Baraga 10 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Bangor Twp (Bay) 103 30 29.1 65 34 52.3
Bangor Twp #8 2 < 10 * 0   0
Bangor (Van Buren) 76 14 18.4 11 < 10 *
Baldwin 44 12 27.3 6 < 10 *
Bad Axe 34 13 38.2 26 16 61.5
Avondale 90 26 28.9 142 80 56.3
AuTrain-Onota 3 < 10 * 0   0
August Academy 1 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Au Gres-Sims 25 13 52 15 11 73.3
Atlanta 16 < 10 * 6 < 10 *
Atherton 43 < 10 * 2 < 10 *
Athens 22 10 45.5 25 17 68
Ashley 13 < 10 * 5 < 10 *
Arts and Technology Academy of Pontiac 33 < 10 * 19 < 10 *
Armada 33 10 30.3 89 50 56.2
Arenac Eastern 4 < 10 * 0   0
Arbor Academy 31 11 35.5 7 < 10 *
Ann Arbor Learning Community 4 < 10 * 10 < 10 *
Ann Arbor 282 77 27.3 876 633 72.3
Anchor Bay 92 47 51.1 295 178 60.3
American Montessori Academy 41 < 10 * 34 13 38.2
American International Academy 41 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Alpena 136 50 36.8 110 56 50.9
Almont 29 18 62.1 72 55 76.4
Alma 89 25 28.1 65 32 49.2
Allendale 62 20 32.3 151 95 62.9
Allen Park 77 33 42.9 175 97 55.4
Allegan 117 42 35.9 58 35 60.3
Algonac 48 20 41.7 71 38 53.5
Alcona 34 12 35.3 12 < 10 *
Alba 12 < 10 * 1 < 10 *
Alanson 12 < 10 * 7 < 10 *
Akron-Fairgrove 14 10 71.4 3 < 10 *
Airport 88 29 33 88 42 47.7
Advanced Technology Academy 75 13 17.3 8 < 10 *
Adrian 144 48 33.3 63 32 50.8
Addison 39 17 43.6 28 11 39.3
Adams Township 23 11 47.8 15 10 66.7
Achieve Charter Academy 12 10 83.3 74 57 77
Academy of Warren 69 < 10 * 3 < 10 *
Academy of International Studies 31 < 10 * 4 < 10 *
Academy for Business and Technology 54 10 18.5 5 < 10 *
Statewide 54,170 15,756 29.1 50,080 30,244 60.4

* Not published by the state.

Source: 2016-17 M-Step results from the Michigan Center for Educational Performance and Information

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Comments

Arjay
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 9:09am

“ ....... Michigan schools can improve learning and can do it without a huge infusion of cash.” Heresy to the MEA union leaders and to a large number of liberals, but the results don’t lie.

Mary Fox
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 12:23pm

You are deluded if you do not think pay matters. Michigan is losing teachers because NOBODY IS GOING TO PAY 60000-100000 for a degree to make 36000, with poor benefits and no pension or job security. Right-wingers are whining now about shortages.

Arjay
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 7:30pm

And maybe each slice of the pie would be larger if there weren’t so many people eating pie. When I went to school granted over 50 years ago there were very few non-classroom people in the building. Today there are more out of the classroom than in it, thanks to the MEA demands and weak school boards that cave.

Matt
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 7:30pm

Mary, I don't see it stated that pay doesn't matter. But you are right, colleges have priced themselves out of line with the incomes many of their grads are likely to make when out in the real world especially when starting out. But to your point, and not begrudging anyone, Michigan has among the highest average pay for teachers in the country, especially when adjusted to reflect our very low cost of living.

Mary Fox
Fri, 04/27/2018 - 4:29pm

I repeat. NO ONE IS GOING TO PAY 60000 -100000 TO GET A DEGREE THAT STARTS ON AVERAGE AT 36000 A YEAR WITH POOR BENEFITS AND POOR RETIREMENT. Michigan's are skew by older staff. Younger staff is not being paid as teachers were in the past and in the next ten years unless something changes, Michigan will be screwed as far as teachers are concerned. Colleges have the same problem. Nobody is going to get a phd for a part-time job.

duane
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 10:08pm

Mary,

What is surprising is that you see nothing in this article or the Cadillac experience that interests you. You only respond to a comment about money.
The Cadillac experience proves that the culture is critical before anything else including money. The kids see and feel the culture they don't see the money, they respond to the culture not to the money. Why is that so important, the kids do the learning not the teachers or staff.
Have you ever been in a classroom that all the students were getting A's or have they always has a distribution of academic success [A's, B's, C's]? The reality was everything was the same [even the money spent] and yet performance varied. The only difference was the students, they expectations of themselves, the effort they made, and that was all a reaction to their individual cultures. In the case of Cadillac they have create the school culture and made it one of significant impact.

If you want more money, we need to see success. We will support success, it is the continue whine for money while deteriorating performance that causes dwindling support for money to the schools. In my district we now have a fight between the Board and Superintendent [union is in the fight to] over money and declining enrollment and during this bickering no one raise the idea of student learning, it is simply adults talking to adults about money.

Get over the money, learn from Cadillac to start delivering results, then ask for money.

Matt
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 9:45am

Glad see articles showcasing schools that successfully address their problems. And can't help noticing that they didn't sit around crying that they weren't getting any help from the Governor, State Leg. and State Board of Ed and therefore can't do anything. They saw their situation, found money in their existing budget and took action. This can't be the only one out there.

RICK
Sun, 04/29/2018 - 4:27pm

A quick solution, in addition to solutions like those in the article, is to vote out the Republicans who have contributed so much to the total deterioration of our schools (and our roads and other infrastructure). They have just cut and cut in order to repeatedly give the corporations and wealthy more money. The middle class has been hit hard by this kind of short sighted, upward income focussed mentality.
Take look at this article (and most Republicans won't even look at it I suspect):
https://www.vox.com/2018/4/25/17276284/arizona-teacher-strike-tax-cut-fu...
Note that Michigan is on the list of GOP led states where education was sacrificed on the tax cuts for the wealthy altar.

Matt
Tue, 05/01/2018 - 3:38pm

Somehow I missed it that political parties had anything to do with this school's wonderful success. Of course it helps not being fixated on Republicans, Snyder, DeVoses, Koches or any the rest of your Boogie Men. Have you considered a different hobby, maybe fishing?

Dan Moerman
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 9:55am

A milennium ago when I took my daughter to kindergarten, I sat around for a few days, just to watch. I had discussed school with my daughter, and learned that she wanted to "learn how to write my name in script." Sounded good to me. But in that classroom, I saw a young boy who, apparently, didn't know just what a crayon was. He fumbled with it, clearly not knowing which end was up. I realized that this lovely little boy had never had a crayon, or a pencil, let alone a felt pen. I'm not sure what his family income was. . . His father worked for the city, and a real benefit of having him as a neighbor was that ours was one of the very first neighborhoods to have our snow plowed. Any thing more I were to say would be pure guess work. But imagine a 5-year old who doesn't know how to color in a bunny. I do believe that the single most important thing a parent can do for pre-schoolers is read to them every day. Even if one has to read the same book 300 times. Because after about 200 times, s/he will be able to "read" it to you, and will have memorized the way the written words sound. And for heaven sakes, kids' crayons should be deductable on your income tax!!

Ben Laird
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 7:45pm

I enjoyed this article on education. I am retired Michigan teacher with 32 years in the classroom. Teacher pay in Michigan is not the issue. Thank God for the MEA!
So teacher pay is not the issue but funding our schools IS one of the major public education issues in Michigan.
This article points out equitable funding is an issue.
“Michigan funds our schools less equitably than many other states, which affects low-income students of all races,” Duke said. Many high-performing states give added money to poor districts because it costs more in additional staffing and resources to raise student achievement among low-income students.”
This article also points out other states target their funding more effectively than Michigan.
“Florida invested heavily in early literacy, in additional staffing and teacher training, to the tune of $130 million in 2014 alone. By comparison, Michigan allocated $6 million for early literacy coaches in 2017.
Florida voters passed a constitutional amendment in 2010 capping class size at 18 for kindergarten through third grade and 22 for fourth through eighth grades. Florida also has universal pre-K available to all families. Michigan’s pre-K program is available only to low- and moderate-income families, and even among those families an estimated 30,000 4-year-olds still do not have access to high-quality early education.”
This article does not point out the gap between the actual annual per pupil cost of educating a student in Michigan and the actual annual per pupil investment Michigan makes in it’s children. Current data indicates this gap is at least $1000 less per student every year compared to states with students scoring higher on standardized testing.
My experience over the years has been that as Michigan has not kept up with funding the actual cost of education professional educators and local school boards have forced to make tough choices in how to cut costs. Usually this cost cutting involves eliminating “unnecessary” staff.
This article does point to this issue.
“Our students just really don’t have the support, and in some cases our schools don’t have the staffing that some other (states) do,” said Ron Koehler, assistant superintendent of Kent Intermediate School District, which includes Grand Rapids Public Schools. “We’re last in the nation in terms of school nurses, for example. We don’t have as many social workers to deal with issues (as other states).”

Great Job Bridge Magazine!
Ben Laird

duane
Fri, 04/27/2018 - 10:58am

Why is this article the exception, it talks about results, about success, and yet they didn't get a sudden infusion of money to deliver this change in results, while almost all others start with money, more money and never talk about performance/learning results?

I learned a long time ago that when asking others for money [whether for my pay, for a new project, for improvements in the service/facility] the results were always presented first and if the results met expectations then I was asked about how much money, what kind of resources, what types of support.
Why is Michigan education different, why are results always the last thing talked about, why is it about how bad things are, how bad they will get, we are so bad when compared to others?

As best I can tell the there are tens of thousands of students that learn enough from public education to go on to college, earn degrees, and compete internationally for employment. How is that with such success what we have is described as so bad?

I wonder how many elementary school principles across Michigan has spent the inordinate sum for a phone call to Cadillac to simply ask and listen about what they have done differently?

With all your years experience, within the classroom was there a distribution of learning success or did all the students learn equally? If there was a curve of success, what did you attribute it to?

Ben Laird
Thu, 04/26/2018 - 7:47pm

I enjoyed this article on education. I am retired Michigan teacher with 32 years in the classroom. Teacher pay in Michigan is not the issue. Thank God for the MEA!
So teacher pay is not the issue but funding our schools IS one of the major public education issues in Michigan.
This article points out equitable funding is an issue.
“Michigan funds our schools less equitably than many other states, which affects low-income students of all races,” Duke said. Many high-performing states give added money to poor districts because it costs more in additional staffing and resources to raise student achievement among low-income students.”
This article also points out other states target their funding more effectively than Michigan.
“Florida invested heavily in early literacy, in additional staffing and teacher training, to the tune of $130 million in 2014 alone. By comparison, Michigan allocated $6 million for early literacy coaches in 2017.
Florida voters passed a constitutional amendment in 2010 capping class size at 18 for kindergarten through third grade and 22 for fourth through eighth grades. Florida also has universal pre-K available to all families. Michigan’s pre-K program is available only to low- and moderate-income families, and even among those families an estimated 30,000 4-year-olds still do not have access to high-quality early education.”
This article does not point out the gap between the actual annual per pupil cost of educating a student in Michigan and the actual annual per pupil investment Michigan makes in it’s children. Current data indicates this gap is at least $1000 less per student every year compared to states with students scoring higher on standardized testing.
My experience over the years has been that as Michigan has not kept up with funding the actual cost of education professional educators and local school boards have forced to make tough choices in how to cut costs. Usually this cost cutting involves eliminating “unnecessary” staff.
This article does point to this issue.
“Our students just really don’t have the support, and in some cases our schools don’t have the staffing that some other (states) do,” said Ron Koehler, assistant superintendent of Kent Intermediate School District, which includes Grand Rapids Public Schools. “We’re last in the nation in terms of school nurses, for example. We don’t have as many social workers to deal with issues (as other states).”

Great Job Bridge Magazine!
Ben Laird

Mike
Sun, 04/29/2018 - 10:55am

This is a good story, a story of local success and children who are better prepared, yet the comments, as usual, show a sharp divide, an unnecessary divide.

It is unfortunate that is the case. The success is based on some new ideas and some old ideas.

Teachers who were unwilling to change were let go. Teachers and staff worked as a team. Kids had food and health care at the school so their basic needs were met, without an income test. Students were held to a standard and given the means and tools to achieve that standard. The State legislature stayed out of their way.

I'd ask the commentators, rather than taking shots at each other to think how these lessons could be applied in their school districts

Barbara Gottschalk
Mon, 04/30/2018 - 9:25am

From 2nd to 59th percentile in two years? This is an extremely rapid gain, almost statistically improbable. I'd have to see additional data before I believe this.